Search Results for: sisimiut

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Sisimiut Snowshoeing adventure

In case you haven’t noticed, I’m a mad, keen hiker 😉 And in the last year I’ve discovered the winter equivalent – snowshoeing!

Snowshoeing into the wilderness

Read more about a relatively short snowshoeing trip I did in February with  Hotel Sisimiut and Tours in my Snowshoing in Sisimiut blog post at Guide to Greenland.


For more information about Sisimiut- check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Sisimiut that I wrote for Guide to Greenland.


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Sisimiut Monster Snowmobile

Having just done my first snowmobile adventure, I discovered that Sisimiut also has monster snowmobiling trips into the backcountry!

The monster snowmobile from Sisimiut Hotel and Tours
Our guide and monster snowmobile!

These are a little more sedate and definitely a lot warmer than the typical snowmobile tour!

Read more about this fantastic way to see the marvelous Sisimiut backcountry in comfort with my Monster Snowmobiling in Sisimiut blog post at Guide to Greenland.

Million thanks to the Hotel Sisimiut and Tours for the experience.


For more information about Sisimiut- check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Sisimiut that I wrote for Guide to Greenland.


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Hotel Sisimiut’s Arctic Spa

I hadn’t walked the Arctic Circle Trail again. But that didn’t stop me from indulging in an Arctic Spa experience at the Hotel Sisimiut on my most recent visit.

In addition to the sauna that I so enjoyed last time, their hot-tubs (called “Wilderness Baths” were also finished and ready for me to soak in. I couldn’t wait to try it!

Read more about this wonderful way to spend an hour or so in Greenland’s second-largest town with my Arctic Spa at the Hotel Sisimiut blog post at Guide to Greenland.

Million thanks to the Hotel Sisimiut for the experience.

This could be you!

For more information about Sisimiut- check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Sisimiut that I wrote for Guide to Greenland.


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Snowmobiling adventure in Sisimiut

Given I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie, I’d always been curious to try snowmobiling. I had my first chance to do so earlier this year when I was up in Sisimiut to learn Greenlandic at KTI’s Oqaatsinik Pikkorissaavik (language school).

Read more about my first experience of snowmobiling at my Snowmobiling in Sisimiut blog post at Guide to Greenland.

Million thanks to Magnus at the Hotel Sisimiut Seamen’s Home for the tour!

Me on the snowmobile near Sisimiut
Me driving the snowmobile outside Sisimiut

For more information about Sisimiut- check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Sisimiut that I wrote for Guide to Greenland.


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Sarfaq Ittuk – Day 5 – Sisimiut – Ilulissat

On the final day on board Sarfaq Ittuk, I awoke to the ship pulling into Aasiaat (population = 3164). Greenland’s 5th largest town is located on an archipelago of low islands and is the only place I’ve been in Greenland that doesn’t have a mountain standing over it!

Approaching Aasiaat - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Colourful houses but no mountain near Aasiaat

Given I would be returning to Aasiaat later in my trip, I decided to stay on board and take photos of the very photogenic abandoned fish factory in the harbour during our 30 minute stopover.

Abandoned fish factory in Aasiaat harbour  - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
An abandoned fish factory in Aasiaat harbour

We departed Aasiaat under gorgeous blue skies for our crossing of Disko Bay to Ilulissat. Everybody was out on deck soaking in the Sun – though it was still a bit chilly so we were all rugged up. Some even wrapped themselves in sleeping bags 😀

Everybody out on deck for Disko Bay crossing  - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Everybody was out on deck for our crossing of Disko Bay. Gorgeous weather!

We sailed past many giant icebergs that would have originated quite close to our destination – in the Ilulissat Icefjord

Huge icebergs in Disko Bay - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Disko Bay is home to huge icebergs

and were eventually rewarded in our lookout for whales.

Disko Bay home to whales in the summer  - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Disko Bay is also home to many many whales during Summer. Especially Humpbacks

Final destination of Sarfaq Ittuk – Ilulissat

The approach to Ilulissat (population = 4632) was spectacular as we sailed across the mouth of the Icefjord.

Unfortunately there was not a huge amount of ice outside of the Icefjord itself on this trip. Clearly the large icebergs were keeping all the smaller ice trapped behind them.

Enormous icebergs block the mount of the Ilulissat Icefjord  - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Enormous icebergs block the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord

Ilulissat is the northernmost town on the epic journey of the Sarfaq Ittuk along the West coast of Greenland. Here I had to bid adieu to my home for the past several days and all the wonderful people I met aboard her, but I very much look forward to my next voyage with Arctic Umiaq Line.

Summary

The Sarfaq Ittuk passenger ferry from Qaqortoq (South Greenland) to Ilulissat (North Greenland) is one of the best ways to experience the world’s largest island. Travelling by sea (as the Inuit did) offers a true perspective of the enormous size of Greenland, and encourages you to slow down, relax, enjoy nature, and really appreciate where you are.

For a more practical look at the journey, I encourage you to read the Go-to Guide to the Sarfaq Ittuk journey that I wrote for Visit Greenland (soon to be published).

And if you have the time – I highly recommend that you include at least a part of this journey in your itinerary for Greenland.

Read more about the Sarfaq Ituuk journey

If this post has piqued your curiosity about travelling with Sarfaq Ittuk in Greenland, read about the rest of my adventure:

I also wrote the Sarfaq Ittuk Ferry – All you need to know page for Visit Greenland. Check it out for more of the logistical details.

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Sarfaq Ittuk – Day 4 – Maniitsoq to Sisimiut

On the day I desperately hoped would be clear, I was greeted once more with grey skies, low clouds and drizzle. This was definitely not what I wanted as we approached Maniitsoq and what is supposed to be an incredible hiking area just beyond it.

Low cloud over Maniitsoq - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Noooooooo! Low fog obscuring the mountains around Maniitsoq

Even our welcoming committee was not quite enough to lift the disappointment I felt, as I had been hoping to get a good look at the terrain.

Welcoming party at Maniitsoq - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
So cute!

The access from the port to the town of Maniitsoq is quite long, but an estimate by Maps.Me indicated that an hour should be enough to do a quick loop through downtown and past the church, and still make it back to the ship before it set sail. So off I set with Eric – a young Kiwi I had been talking to quite a bit.

Eric descending to Maniitsoq - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Eric leading the way

It is VERY quiet at 7am on a Saturday morning in Maniitsoq!

Various views of Maniitsoq - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Views of Maniitsoq

Around Hamborgerland on Sarfaq Ittuk

The next couple of hours were spent sailing through the inner fjord North of Maniitsoq and around Hamborgerland (no, it doesn’t mean what you think). There were glaciers everywhere and impressive-looking, half-hidden mountains. Oh, what I would have given to see this in amazing light!

Hamborgerland near Maniitsoq - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
I sooooooo want to come back here and hike!

Actually – I did end up “seeing” it in amazing light when my good friend and fellow photographer Miki did the trip about 6 weeks later. OMG!

Hamborgerland panorama taken by Miklos Varga from Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland

Photo: Miklós Varga (@0miklos_varga0). Move cursor over image to see full panorama

2020 hiking/kayaking expedition anyone?

Kangaamiut via Sarfaq Ittuk

Our next port was Kangaamiut – population 287. This small settlement is the gateway to the Eternity Fjord – apparently one of the most picturesque fjords in Greenland (that’s really saying something!) and part of my plan for my hiking/kayaking expedition sometime soon.

Approaching Kangaamiut - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Approaching Kangaamiut

Kangaamiut itself was actually a really picturesque place – with its brightly coloured houses and racks for drying fish greeting us as we approached.

Kangaamiut - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland

As with Arsuk, the harbour in Kangaamiut is too small for Sarfaq Ittuk to dock – so the whole procedure with offloading the zodiac etc was repeated.

Transfer at Kangaamiut - - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Transfer at Kangaamiut

After lunch I went to see if I could have a peek in the bridge. 2nd officer Tuperna was on duty and did a wonderful job of explaining how the radar and all the other instrumentation worked.

Tuperna on the bridge of Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Tuperna on the bridge of Sarfaq Ittuk with plenty of screens and maps, and the best view on the ship

When I asked her what were the spots of colour I could see on the radar – she explained they were waves. And here I was worried if they would be able to see the icebergs on my first night on board!

We spent about 2 hours chatting about sailing, navigation, working on ships, travel, music and life in general.   At one point, I tried to guess how long it would take for an approaching ship to reach us (failing dismally), and asked her what was the most amazing thing she’d ever seen from the bridge. Her answer: rainbows and whales playing. And the most boring? Fog. If it is foggy you can’t see anything and you have to watch the radar very closely.

view from the bridge - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
View from the bridge of Sarfaq Ittuk. Not much out there at the minute…

Community atmosphere on board Sarfaq Ittuk

When Tuperna went off on her break, I wandered back down to the Café Sarfaq to discover that a local musician from Paamiut – Pevia Geisler – had set up a keyboard and was cranking out tunes.

musician playing an impromptu concert in Cafe Sarfaq - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Pevia entertaining the passengers

He sang a mix of popular Greenlandic and international (have you ever heard “Julie, if you love me truly” sung in Greenlandic?) classics, and the Café was full of local Greenlanders knitting, chatting and encouraging him with every song to keep going.

This wasn’t scheduled as part of the trip. It was just an impromptu performance. But it is these random experiences and the community feeling on board that make the trip so special.

Sisimiut in 2 hours – Sarfaq Ittuk

The skies were almost clear when we arrived in the second-largest town in Greenland (and one of my favourites) – Sisimiut.

approaching Sisimiut harbour - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Sisimiut, with Nasaasaaq mountain in the background

5477 people call this home, and a good crowd turned out to greet us when we docked at the harbour.

Welcome at Sisimiut harbour - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Sisimiut welcome

We had 2 hours in Sisimiut so I went to take a photograph I had forgotten last year when I was here

Fisherman sculpture in Sisimiut
Fisherman sculpture in Sisimiut

and then wandered over to the large church, which was actually open! I had not seen it open in the 9 days I spent here last year after hiking the Arctic Circle Trail.

Sisimiut church
Zion Church – Sisimiut

OMG! This is the most beautiful interior of a church I have ever seen! The wooden panelling. The chandeliers. The artwork made of sealskin. I stayed there for about 20 minutes just marvelling at its beauty.

Inside Zion Church - Sisimiut
Inside Zion Church. The image in bottom right is made out of coloured bits of sealskin

Two hours later, everyone was out on deck in the beautiful light to farewell Sisimiut and the impressive Nasaasaaq Mountain that dominates over it,

leaving Sisimiut - Sarfaq Ittuk - West Greenland
Farewell Sisimiut – until next time

and to watch yet another impressive Greenlandic sunset.

Sunset from Sarfaq Ittuk near Sisimiut - West Greenland

Read more about the Sarfaq Ituuk journey

If this post has piqued your curiosity about travelling with Sarfaq Ittuk in Greenland, read about the rest of my adventure:

I also wrote the Sarfaq Ittuk Ferry – All you need to know page for Visit Greenland. Check it out for more of the logistical details.

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!

Hiking Greenland – Sisimiut’s UFO Hut

My plan upon arriving in Sisimiut after trekking the 160km Arctic Circle Trail from Kangerlussuaq, was to spend several more days in town doing day-hikes around the area. I found .gpx trails for several hikes at Destination Arctic Circle (thanks guys!) and was super-keen to do the “UFO Hike” in particular. After all, what exactly would I find at the end of a “UFO Hike”??

As with the hike to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain, the first 3.5km of this trail follows a dirt road out of town. Fortunately it is a different dirt road to the one that leads to Nasaasaaq and the Arctic Circle Trail (which I’d already seen 3 times by now), and there is a period of interest when it leads you right through the middle of “Dog Town”. This is the area on the outskirts of Sisimiut where the majority of town’s Greenlandic Sled Dogs are chained awaiting the winter months. I grumbled to Tyson about hiking along roads (it’s definitely not my favourite thing) as we made our way to its end and the start of the trail.

Hiking along the road at the start of the Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Not the most interesting part of the hike

The narrow track we followed through the wilderness led us slowly upward, and my complaining stopped completely when we crested the first ridge and had a clear view of the valley we’d be hiking through. The landscape in front of us was absolutely stunning!

Panorama of the valley leading to the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

[move cursor over image to see the full panorama]

We stayed on the high track (we could see another below us) for several kilometers before it seemed to just disappear. The track below us was also no longer visible. Checking the trail notes we had picked up in the foyer of the Hotel Sisimiut, we had clearly come to the part described by the following:

…it may be difficult to find the trail at this point, but when in doubt follow the running water that flows between the mountains at the bottom of the valley…

Hotel Sisimiut

Hmmmm…

“Oh well” we figured as we headed down towards the boggy ground around the river – something we’d been trying to avoid by staying high 🙁

Hiker approaching the boggy ground at the bottom of the valley -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

Our hope was to find a physical trail at the bottom of the valley that would coincide with the .gpx trail I had downloaded (the ridge trail was off by about 500m). But alas, there was no trail to be found.

Right.

Time to start bush-bashing!

Hiker mid-way through bush-bashing along the bottom of the valley leading to the  Sisimiut UFO - West Greenland
Tyson searching for a trail through the vegetation

This is not the easiest thing to do when your boots have sunk so far into the spongy moss that they have all but disappeared (I actually ended up face-first a couple of times after stepping in hidden holes). Nor is it easy when, having made it through the moss, you are then confronted with a hip-high wall of Arctic Willow!

Disappearing boots (top) and almost disappearing bodies (bottom) -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Moss (top) and Arctic Willow (bottom) were the main obstacles along the UFO hike

2km later and wringing wet (the dew-laden Arctic Willow saturated me within 5 steps) it was a relief to finally recover the trail and exit this “uncharted” section of the hike.

Trail leading off into the distance -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
This was a welcome relief from our bush-bashing

The trail became more obvious (and much dryer!) as we started to climb. Then – a sudden surprise! A beautiful lake with almost perfect reflections!

Mountains reflected in a still lake -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

Given that this relatively large body of water didn’t appear on Maps.Me (the offline map app of choice for both Tyson and myself), we decided to name it “Hidden Lake” as we hiked around its edge.

Hiking around the end of a still lake -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

A second lake appeared after the first, and both the views in the direction we were heading and back down over the lakes became more and more stunning as we crested several false passes.

Views from the trail -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Views towards the pass (top) and back down over the lakes (bottom) became more and more beautiful as we climbed

Eventually, we arrived at the actual pass and could see our final destination – still about 3km distant.

First sight of the UFO from the top of the pass -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Can you see the UFO on the right-hand part of the hill in the mid-ground?

Crossing this final stretch towards Sisimiut’s UFO was a bit of a surreal experience. How cool is it to have a back-country hut in the shape of a UFO?!

Hiking towards the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

We climbed the ladder into the heart of the ship to check out the inside. There was no lock, just a circular disk of plywood covering the access hatch, and nothing inside either.

Climbing into the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

It was a great place to escape the cool breeze that had sprung up and have lunch, but I imagine it would be extremely noisy, and the structure would move quite a bit if you had more than about 4 people in there! It is an actual Hut that you can stay at, and our friend Aqqalooraq, who works reception at the Hotel Sisimiut, told us he’d been there several years ago on a school excursion.

Inside Sisimiut's UFO Hut -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

[move cursor over image to see the full panorama]

One thing about Sisimiut’s aliens – they picked an amazingly beautiful spot to land!

View of the UFO Hut overlooking the Kangerlusarsuk Fjord -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
An amazing view!

Well … actually, they didn’t initially.

The UFO was originally located just outside of Sisimiut and was transported to its current location overlooking the Kangerlusarsuk Fjord (at the opposite end to the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord hut) by helicopter in the 1980s. Why it was built in the first place … I don’t have the full story yet, but will update this post once I do 🙂

The hike back to Sisimiut was along the same route as we took to get out to the UFO. It really is a very, very beautiful hike, and I entertained myself with a game of “could this be evidence of alien life?” as we made the return trip.

Views hiking back towards the pass -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Looking up towards the pass from the bottom of the area leading to the UFO (top) and evidence for alien life??!! (bottom)

When we got back to the “uncharted” part of the hike, we did another search for a trail (the last thing we wanted to do was bush-bash through again), but there was nothing visible from this direction either. We suspect the trail has simply been overgrown. Let me know if you find it!

Just before we reached the end of the trail where it rejoins the road, we started to come across lots of locals picking crowberries. It was a Sunday afternoon and whole families were out with buckets collecting these slightly tart berries to turn into desserts for the week.

Locals collecting crowberries -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

I was only introduced to the joys of wild foraging earlier this year, and certainly picked my fill of blueberries as I hiked along the Arctic Circle Trail. I love that gathering crowberries, blueberries and mushrooms seems to be a common past-time for the residents of Sisimiut – at least from what I saw during my week and a half there at the end of August 🙂

Recommendation

The hike out to the UFO Hut from Sisimiut is not technically challenging (unless you count the bush-bashing part) but it is long.

The reward is hiking through an incredibly beautiful valley, and the surreal experience of being able to climb into a UFO at the end of it! I loved this hike!

Trekking Information

Distance = 23.2km

Time taken = 6hr 39mins

GPX File = Hiking-Greenland-Sisimiut-UFO.gpx

Strava Link =https://www.strava.com/activities/1813014060

Map

Basic Map of Sisimiut UFO Hike- from Strava

Altitude Profile

Basic Altitude Profile of Sisimiut UFO Hike - West Greenland

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and hiking adventures here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Hiking Greenland – Nasaasaaq Mountain – Sisimiut

The most popular day-hike from Sisimiut is the climb up Palasip Qaqqaa – the 544m mountain that overlooks the airport. However, Tyson and I aren’t really ones to follow the crowds, and so on the first clear day after arriving in Sisimiut, we decided to tackle the pyramid-shaped Nasaasaaq Mountain (784m) instead.

Nasaasaaq mountain rises steeply behind the colourful houses of Sisimiut - West Greenland
The summit of Nasaasaaq is the triangular peak to the left of the image, and a key landmark above Sismiut. It is actually much higher than the bluff on the right, which we also climbed

We picked up the trail notes for the “Hard Route” (of course!) from the foyer of the Hotel Sisimiut and headed along the extremely boring 2km of road past the lakes that provide the town with drinking water. We had already hiked this section of road a few days earlier when we arrived in Sisimiut after 8 days on the Arctic Circle Trail. It wasn’t interesting then, and was even less so now! But as soon as we left the road and started trying to follow the trail notes, things became very interesting indeed!

We headed across boggy ground towards the rocky knoll as per the instructions

Start of the "Hard Route" up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The start of the “Hard Route” up Nasaasaaq mountain

and figured that the steep gully to our left looked about right.

Steep gully at the start of the "Hard Route" up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

The added bonus was a fairly well defined track that we followed for most of the way up, and the occasional small stone cairn with blue paint on it.

Hiking up the trail along the gully at the start of the Nasaasaaq mountain hike - Sisimiut, West Greenland
We had a fairly early start to our hike

At the top of the pass we had a beautiful view over the valley we’d hiked along on the last day of the Arctic Circle Trail

View from the small pass at the top of the gully along the Hard Route up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The valley through which the Arctic Circle Trail approaches Sisimiut

before turning right along a very faint trail leading off to what looked to be a cairn in the distance. Hmmm… Is this right? It was what the trail notes said to do, but it didn’t inspire confidence that our “superhighway” trail suddenly became barely visible.

Heading along an uncertain trail - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Tyson is thinking “Are you sure??”

We persevered, however, and eventually arrived at the structure I had seen from the pass. It was indeed a cairn, and it even had blue paint on it!

Hiker approaching a cairn on the flank of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Thank goodness this thing that I’d seen in the distance turned out to be a cairn!

This was a relief, as we were clearly not following the .gpx trail I’d downloaded. That trail was about 100m straight up the cliff towering above us, with no way for us to reach it from our current location. We really had little choice but to follow the edge of the cliff or backtrack and try to find a different route. We decided to press on…

View of Sisimiut from above, hiking the flank of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Sisimiut, with its two lakes that act as drinking water reservoirs, spread out below the route we took to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain

Fortunately, we encountered several other cairns, which ultimately led us along the upper flank of the mountain. Meanwhile, Tyson did his best to ignore the very steep drop-off to our right (fortunately dodgy heights don’t worry me too much)!

View over hiker and distant valley as we flank the side of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Cliff on one side, steep drop on the other. There was only one way forward.

Eventually, the trail turned upwards and we played “spot the blue spot” as we ascended through the rocks to the saddle point mentioned in the trail notes. It did exist! Despite us long having given up hope of ever finding it.

Hiker making his way up steep rocky slope - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Fortunately it wasn’t too hard to spot the next “blue spot” amongst all the rocks

Now that we’d managed to make it onto the ridge, we decided to first of all head over to our right to explore the rocky bluff in that direction.

Rocky bluff that forms the end of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Rocky bluff at the end of the Nasaasaaq mountain range

We had a great view back over to our goal for the hike – the summit of Narsaasaaq,

View of Nasaasaaq peak from the rocky bluff - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The triangular Nasaasaaq peak from the rocky bluff at the end of the mountain

as well as Sisimiut

View of Sisimiut from rocky bluff of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Greenland’s second largest city – Sisimiut – seen from the rocky bluff. Palasip Qaqqaa, the most popular day-hike, is the mountain at top-right

and the alpine peaks along the Arctic Circle to the South of the city.

Peaks to the south of Sisimiut from Nasaasaaq mountain - West Greenland
Looking South to the Arctic Circle

After taking in the views for a while, it was time to turn around and head for the main event.

Hiker heading towards the triangular peak of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

The closer we got to the final ascent, the more daunting it looked.

Side-view of the steep ascent to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Note the two hikers at the base of the slope!

And indeed. This is not one for the faint-hearted or vertiginous! For the most part, it is a very, very steep rock scramble/climb, though there is a trail to help guide you along the only accessible route

Scrambling up boulders on the way to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
It was an impressive rock scramble/climb to the summit

which has ropes to help you up/down otherwise impassable obstacles.

rope assists on the way to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Thank goodness for the ropes!

In the end, the 360-degree panoramic reward was totally worth the effort and nerves – especially on a day like this with clear views and no wind.

Panorama of ridge view at summit of  Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

[move cursor over the image to see the full panorama]

Panorama of valley with Arctic Circle Trail from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

[move cursor over the image to see the full panorama]

Views from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Views from the summit of Nasaasaaq – the Amerloq Fjord (top) and Sisimiut (bottom)

Unfortunately, the light was not the best for photography 🙁 If I ever get another opportunity, I will camp at the saddle and climb the peak twice – once in the evening for the views over the Amerloq fjord and the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq, and again in the morning for views over the valley through which the Arctic Circle Trail runs.

Amerloq Fjord from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The Amerloq Fjord as seen from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain. Can you spot the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq on the island at bottom-right?

After about an hour at the top, we very carefully made our way back to the saddle and decided to follow the “Medium-hard Route” back to Sisimiut.

Medium-Hard route down Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The Medium-hard route was very obvious

This trail led us down towards the valley with the Arctic Circle Trail, and there we discovered where we’d gone wrong on the way up.

At the top of the first gully, we should have walked about 100m further and started to descend before turning right. There is a VERY obvious trail heading up towards the saddle if you do that, and all of the “Hard Route” trail notes suddenly make perfect sense. I guess we followed the “Super-hard-core Route” up the mountain! But it did have more spectacular views 😉

The “Medium-hard Route” is another obvious track that turns off from the Arctic Circle Trail rather than ascending up the gully. If you are hiking the Arctic Circle Trail, have time, and the weather is reasonable, I’d recommend taking this trail at the end of the hike and spending an extra night camping at the saddle of Nasaasaaq. This would allow you to climb the mountain on the way into town, rather than doing it as a day hike afterwards. Look for the cairn with both red (indicating the Arctic Circle Trail) and blue (indicating the Nasaasaaq trail) paint on it, and a trail leading off to your left as you approach Sisimiut.

Trail coming up from the Arctic Circle Trail - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The track for the “Medium-hard Route” heading down towards the Arctic Circle Trail

Recommendation

The hike to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain is truly spectacular and a little challenging – even if you don’t take the “Super-hard-core Route”.

Both the “Hard Route” and “Medium-hard Route” have steep sections and parts where you need to scramble over rocks, but the real issue is the final ascent to the summit. If you are not good with heights or are uncertain about your abilities, do not attempt this part!! You still have amazing views over Sisimiut, the mountains along the Arctic Circle to the South, and up the Amerloq Fjord from the rocky bluff at the end of the Nasaasaaq range, so stick with that and don’t force a search and rescue operation (it is more common than you imagine!)

Trekking Information

Distance = 14.7km

Time taken = 6hr 35mins

GPX File = Hiking-Greenland-Nasaasaaq-Mountain.gpx

Strava Link =https://www.strava.com/activities/1813015128

Map

Basic Map of the route we took up Nasaasaaq Mountain near Sisimiut, West Greenland - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude Profile of the route we took up Nasaasaaq Mountain near Sisimiut, West Greenland - from Strava

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and hiking adventures here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
Greenland-Hotel-Sisimiut-Souvenir-Workshop-ideas-board.jpg

Greenland – Sisimiut souvenir workshop

Working my way through the folder of activities at the Hotel Sisimiut, I came across a single A4 page offering the opportunity to “create your own memories” by making your own Greenlandic souvenir. 

Awesome idea! 

Image of the A4 flyer advertising the workshop - Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
I’m in!

I was super excited, because I love to make things for myself (e.g. jewelry in Nicaragua and El Salvador, a bookmark in Guatemala) but it can be quite challenging to find small workshops like this.    

The information sheet said to contact the wait-staff in the Nasaasaaq Restaurant and Brasserie, which is how I found myself following the restaurant manager through to the Conference Centre wing of the hotel a few days later.  There, he unlocked the cupboard of goodies

Image of the full cupboard of materials you can choose to work with in the Hotel Sisimiut create your own memories workshop - West Greenland
Cupboard of goodies

and explained that each of the materials was labeled with a price.  I simply had to note down how many of what materials I used on the form and then pay at the restaurant after I was finished. 

And with that, he left me to my imagination and creativity 😊

Images of some of the materials available to use in the Hotel Sisimiut Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
The labels are all in Danish but that doesn’t really matter. They also include the prices.

I’m not very good starting with a blank slate, so I studied the samples on the ideas board for inspiration.

Inspiration board for the Hotel Sisimiut create your own memories workshop - West Greenland
Inspiration

I knew I wanted to make a piece of jewelry.  I knew that I wanted to use reindeer antler and seal skin (the most Greenlandic of the items available).  What I didn’t know was how to tie knots or any other spacing/fastening techniques to allow me to create my masterpiece.  Hmmm… 

Images of the materials I chose to work with in the Sisimiut Hotel Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
The materials I decided to go with – reindeer antler, seal skin and beads

I put on Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq (the latest album from my favourite band, Nanook, who are also from Greenland) for further inspiration, and after deliberating and pondering and studying one of the pieces from the ideas board to see how knots had been used – I had my plan.  It also helped that I found a glue gun!

Image of the workspace with my materials on the table at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
The workspace is really beautiful! You can see the keyring I used to teach myself about knots over near the jars

It took another hour to actually create my Greenlandic souvenir, during which time several of the kitchen staff popped by to have a chat and check out what I was doing.  And in the end, I was ridiculously happy with the result 😊

Image of the necklace I created in the Hotel Sisimiut Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
My masterpiece

So much so, in fact, that I went around the hotel showing it off to all the staff I’d gotten to know so well over the previous week.  I also showed it to several guests I’d been chatting with who asked “where did you make that?”   It pays to read the folder of activities at the hotel thoroughly!

Recommendation

If you like to make things, this cool workshop offered by the Hotel Sisimiut is an awesome way to spend a few hours.  The materials available are an interesting mix that challenges your creativity, and the workspace is really beautiful.

Cost:  You pay for the materials you use so it all depends on what you create 😊  No individual item is very expensive and you can use as much or as little as you wish.  To give you an idea, my masterpiece cost a grand total of 13DKK or USD$2.

Time: As long as you want.  For me, they just unlocked the cupboard and left me with it. 

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Greenland – Sisimiut rock and mineral collection at KTI

I talk a lot about the beauty of Greenlandic rocks in my blog posts.  I also keep bemoaning the fact that I didn’t end up studying geology at university (it was either that or astronomy – I chose astronomy) and that I’m not wandering around Greenland with a geologist by my side.  So it should come as no surprise that I had to go check out the rock and mineral collection while in Sisimiut!

Housed in the foyer of the local technical college, KTI (Kalaallit Nunaanni Teknikkimik Ilinniarfik – Greenlandic is an amazing language), this is the largest collection of minerals in Greenland. 

Rock and mineral collection is location in the foyer of the technical college - Sisimiut - West Greenland
Yes, it really is located in the foyer – you just wander in! There were a bunch of students sitting at the other tables while I was visiting

It was established by Bjarne Ljungdahl (a former employee of the college) to display samples he’d collected from all over Greenland during his geological work from 1972-1981

One of the display cabinets featuring rocks and minerals in Sisimiut, West Greenland

and has expanded significantly since its inception.  The 21 display cases now include minerals from all over the world, and there are also 12 low pillars showcasing large rock samples. 

Image of the many display cases at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
You can see the large rock samples on the blue pillars between the display cases

There is one display case specifically dedicated to fossils

Display case of fossils at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland

and another to meteorite fragments.  Please tell me Australia didn’t name a meteorite after a chocolate maker!!

Meteorite from Australia on display at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
Cadbury chocolate is the most popular brand in Australia

There is also a special display case set into the wall that shows the fluorescence of several minerals.

Fluorescent minerals at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
Minerals fluorescing under UV light

Given my lack of success in finding Tugtupit while clambouring all over Kvanefjeld in South Greenland last year, I was particularly fascinated by the large sample of this rare mineral on display here.  And equally amazed at the sheer number and diversity of minerals that can be found in Greenland.  No wonder the mining companies are trying to get in!

Greenlandic minerals, including Tugtupit, on display in Sisimiut, West Greenland
So this is what Tugtupit looks like!

The collection is very, very well done with everything labelled (in Danish) and carefully arranged in well-lit display cabinets.  If you are rock/mineral enthusiast, I have no doubt you could spend a couple of hours here.  And even if you only have a passing interest, you’ll still find a short visit worthwhile.

Recommendation

I might be biased, but I really enjoyed this collection.  To find it – enter the main door of KTI (yes, it will feel weird walking into a school but go with it) and veer around to your right.  You can’t miss it.  

Keep in mind that because it is part of a school, it is only open during school hours 🙂  And you’ll have students looking at you wondering why you are so interested in rocks!

Time: 5 mins to 5 hours depending on your interest

Cost:  Free

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!