Search Results for: sisimiut

Hiking Greenland – Sisimiut’s UFO Hut

My plan upon arriving in Sisimiut after trekking the 160km Arctic Circle Trail from Kangerlussuaq, was to spend several more days in town doing day-hikes around the area. I found .gpx trails for several hikes at Destination Arctic Circle (thanks guys!) and was super-keen to do the “UFO Hike” in particular. After all, what exactly would I find at the end of a “UFO Hike”??

As with the hike to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain, the first 3.5km of this trail follows a dirt road out of town. Fortunately it is a different dirt road to the one that leads to Nasaasaaq and the Arctic Circle Trail (which I’d already seen 3 times by now), and there is a period of interest when it leads you right through the middle of “Dog Town”. This is the area on the outskirts of Sisimiut where the majority of town’s Greenlandic Sled Dogs are chained awaiting the winter months. I grumbled to Tyson about hiking along roads (it’s definitely not my favourite thing) as we made our way to its end and the start of the trail.

Hiking along the road at the start of the Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Not the most interesting part of the hike

The narrow track we followed through the wilderness led us slowly upward, and my complaining stopped completely when we crested the first ridge and had a clear view of the valley we’d be hiking through. The landscape in front of us was absolutely stunning!

Panorama of the valley leading to the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

[move cursor over image to see the full panorama]

We stayed on the high track (we could see another below us) for several kilometers before it seemed to just disappear. The track below us was also no longer visible. Checking the trail notes we had picked up in the foyer of the Hotel Sisimiut, we had clearly come to the part described by the following:

…it may be difficult to find the trail at this point, but when in doubt follow the running water that flows between the mountains at the bottom of the valley…

Hotel Sisimiut

Hmmmm…

“Oh well” we figured as we headed down towards the boggy ground around the river – something we’d been trying to avoid by staying high 🙁

Hiker approaching the boggy ground at the bottom of the valley -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

Our hope was to find a physical trail at the bottom of the valley that would coincide with the .gpx trail I had downloaded (the ridge trail was off by about 500m). But alas, there was no trail to be found.

Right.

Time to start bush-bashing!

Hiker mid-way through bush-bashing along the bottom of the valley leading to the  Sisimiut UFO - West Greenland
Tyson searching for a trail through the vegetation

This is not the easiest thing to do when your boots have sunk so far into the spongy moss that they have all but disappeared (I actually ended up face-first a couple of times after stepping in hidden holes). Nor is it easy when, having made it through the moss, you are then confronted with a hip-high wall of Arctic Willow!

Disappearing boots (top) and almost disappearing bodies (bottom) -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Moss (top) and Arctic Willow (bottom) were the main obstacles along the UFO hike

2km later and wringing wet (the dew-laden Arctic Willow saturated me within 5 steps) it was a relief to finally recover the trail and exit this “uncharted” section of the hike.

Trail leading off into the distance -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
This was a welcome relief from our bush-bashing

The trail became more obvious (and much dryer!) as we started to climb. Then – a sudden surprise! A beautiful lake with almost perfect reflections!

Mountains reflected in a still lake -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

Given that this relatively large body of water didn’t appear on Maps.Me (the offline map app of choice for both Tyson and myself), we decided to name it “Hidden Lake” as we hiked around its edge.

Hiking around the end of a still lake -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

A second lake appeared after the first, and both the views in the direction we were heading and back down over the lakes became more and more stunning as we crested several false passes.

Views from the trail -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Views towards the pass (top) and back down over the lakes (bottom) became more and more beautiful as we climbed

Eventually, we arrived at the actual pass and could see our final destination – still about 3km distant.

First sight of the UFO from the top of the pass -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Can you see the UFO on the right-hand part of the hill in the mid-ground?

Crossing this final stretch towards Sisimiut’s UFO was a bit of a surreal experience. How cool is it to have a back-country hut in the shape of a UFO?!

Hiking towards the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

We climbed the ladder into the heart of the ship to check out the inside. There was no lock, just a circular disk of plywood covering the access hatch, and nothing inside either.

Climbing into the UFO -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

It was a great place to escape the cool breeze that had sprung up and have lunch, but I imagine it would be extremely noisy, and the structure would move quite a bit if you had more than about 4 people in there! It is an actual Hut that you can stay at, and our friend Aqqalooraq, who works reception at the Hotel Sisimiut, told us he’d been there several years ago on a school excursion.

Inside Sisimiut's UFO Hut -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

[move cursor over image to see the full panorama]

One thing about Sisimiut’s aliens – they picked an amazingly beautiful spot to land!

View of the UFO Hut overlooking the Kangerlusarsuk Fjord -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
An amazing view!

Well … actually, they didn’t initially.

The UFO was originally located just outside of Sisimiut and was transported to its current location overlooking the Kangerlusarsuk Fjord (at the opposite end to the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord hut) by helicopter in the 1980s. Why it was built in the first place … I don’t have the full story yet, but will update this post once I do 🙂

The hike back to Sisimiut was along the same route as we took to get out to the UFO. It really is a very, very beautiful hike, and I entertained myself with a game of “could this be evidence of alien life?” as we made the return trip.

Views hiking back towards the pass -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland
Looking up towards the pass from the bottom of the area leading to the UFO (top) and evidence for alien life??!! (bottom)

When we got back to the “uncharted” part of the hike, we did another search for a trail (the last thing we wanted to do was bush-bash through again), but there was nothing visible from this direction either. We suspect the trail has simply been overgrown. Let me know if you find it!

Just before we reached the end of the trail where it rejoins the road, we started to come across lots of locals picking crowberries. It was a Sunday afternoon and whole families were out with buckets collecting these slightly tart berries to turn into desserts for the week.

Locals collecting crowberries -  Sisimiut UFO hike - West Greenland

I was only introduced to the joys of wild foraging earlier this year, and certainly picked my fill of blueberries as I hiked along the Arctic Circle Trail. I love that gathering crowberries, blueberries and mushrooms seems to be a common past-time for the residents of Sisimiut – at least from what I saw during my week and a half there at the end of August 🙂

Recommendation

The hike out to the UFO Hut from Sisimiut is not technically challenging (unless you count the bush-bashing part) but it is long.

The reward is hiking through an incredibly beautiful valley, and the surreal experience of being able to climb into a UFO at the end of it! I loved this hike!

Trekking Information

Distance = 23.2km

Time taken = 6hr 39mins

GPX File = Hiking-Greenland-Sisimiut-UFO.gpx

Strava Link =https://www.strava.com/activities/1813014060

Map

Basic Map of Sisimiut UFO Hike- from Strava

Altitude Profile

Basic Altitude Profile of Sisimiut UFO Hike - West Greenland

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and hiking adventures here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Hiking Greenland – Nasaasaaq Mountain – Sisimiut

The most popular day-hike from Sisimiut is the climb up Palasip Qaqqaa – the 544m mountain that overlooks the airport. However, Tyson and I aren’t really ones to follow the crowds, and so on the first clear day after arriving in Sisimiut, we decided to tackle the pyramid-shaped Nasaasaaq Mountain (784m) instead.

Nasaasaaq mountain rises steeply behind the colourful houses of Sisimiut - West Greenland
The summit of Nasaasaaq is the triangular peak to the left of the image, and a key landmark above Sismiut. It is actually much higher than the bluff on the right, which we also climbed

We picked up the trail notes for the “Hard Route” (of course!) from the foyer of the Hotel Sisimiut and headed along the extremely boring 2km of road past the lakes that provide the town with drinking water. We had already hiked this section of road a few days earlier when we arrived in Sisimiut after 8 days on the Arctic Circle Trail. It wasn’t interesting then, and was even less so now! But as soon as we left the road and started trying to follow the trail notes, things became very interesting indeed!

We headed across boggy ground towards the rocky knoll as per the instructions

Start of the "Hard Route" up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The start of the “Hard Route” up Nasaasaaq mountain

and figured that the steep gully to our left looked about right.

Steep gully at the start of the "Hard Route" up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

The added bonus was a fairly well defined track that we followed for most of the way up, and the occasional small stone cairn with blue paint on it.

Hiking up the trail along the gully at the start of the Nasaasaaq mountain hike - Sisimiut, West Greenland
We had a fairly early start to our hike

At the top of the pass we had a beautiful view over the valley we’d hiked along on the last day of the Arctic Circle Trail

View from the small pass at the top of the gully along the Hard Route up Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The valley through which the Arctic Circle Trail approaches Sisimiut

before turning right along a very faint trail leading off to what looked to be a cairn in the distance. Hmmm… Is this right? It was what the trail notes said to do, but it didn’t inspire confidence that our “superhighway” trail suddenly became barely visible.

Heading along an uncertain trail - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Tyson is thinking “Are you sure??”

We persevered, however, and eventually arrived at the structure I had seen from the pass. It was indeed a cairn, and it even had blue paint on it!

Hiker approaching a cairn on the flank of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Thank goodness this thing that I’d seen in the distance turned out to be a cairn!

This was a relief, as we were clearly not following the .gpx trail I’d downloaded. That trail was about 100m straight up the cliff towering above us, with no way for us to reach it from our current location. We really had little choice but to follow the edge of the cliff or backtrack and try to find a different route. We decided to press on…

View of Sisimiut from above, hiking the flank of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Sisimiut, with its two lakes that act as drinking water reservoirs, spread out below the route we took to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain

Fortunately, we encountered several other cairns, which ultimately led us along the upper flank of the mountain. Meanwhile, Tyson did his best to ignore the very steep drop-off to our right (fortunately dodgy heights don’t worry me too much)!

View over hiker and distant valley as we flank the side of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Cliff on one side, steep drop on the other. There was only one way forward.

Eventually, the trail turned upwards and we played “spot the blue spot” as we ascended through the rocks to the saddle point mentioned in the trail notes. It did exist! Despite us long having given up hope of ever finding it.

Hiker making his way up steep rocky slope - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Fortunately it wasn’t too hard to spot the next “blue spot” amongst all the rocks

Now that we’d managed to make it onto the ridge, we decided to first of all head over to our right to explore the rocky bluff in that direction.

Rocky bluff that forms the end of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Rocky bluff at the end of the Nasaasaaq mountain range

We had a great view back over to our goal for the hike – the summit of Narsaasaaq,

View of Nasaasaaq peak from the rocky bluff - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The triangular Nasaasaaq peak from the rocky bluff at the end of the mountain

as well as Sisimiut

View of Sisimiut from rocky bluff of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Greenland’s second largest city – Sisimiut – seen from the rocky bluff. Palasip Qaqqaa, the most popular day-hike, is the mountain at top-right

and the alpine peaks along the Arctic Circle to the South of the city.

Peaks to the south of Sisimiut from Nasaasaaq mountain - West Greenland
Looking South to the Arctic Circle

After taking in the views for a while, it was time to turn around and head for the main event.

Hiker heading towards the triangular peak of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

The closer we got to the final ascent, the more daunting it looked.

Side-view of the steep ascent to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Note the two hikers at the base of the slope!

And indeed. This is not one for the faint-hearted or vertiginous! For the most part, it is a very, very steep rock scramble/climb, though there is a trail to help guide you along the only accessible route

Scrambling up boulders on the way to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
It was an impressive rock scramble/climb to the summit

which has ropes to help you up/down otherwise impassable obstacles.

rope assists on the way to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Thank goodness for the ropes!

In the end, the 360-degree panoramic reward was totally worth the effort and nerves – especially on a day like this with clear views and no wind.

Panorama of ridge view at summit of  Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

[move cursor over the image to see the full panorama]

Panorama of valley with Arctic Circle Trail from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland

[move cursor over the image to see the full panorama]

Views from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Views from the summit of Nasaasaaq – the Amerloq Fjord (top) and Sisimiut (bottom)

Unfortunately, the light was not the best for photography 🙁 If I ever get another opportunity, I will camp at the saddle and climb the peak twice – once in the evening for the views over the Amerloq fjord and the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq, and again in the morning for views over the valley through which the Arctic Circle Trail runs.

Amerloq Fjord from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The Amerloq Fjord as seen from the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain. Can you spot the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq on the island at bottom-right?

After about an hour at the top, we very carefully made our way back to the saddle and decided to follow the “Medium-hard Route” back to Sisimiut.

Medium-Hard route down Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The Medium-hard route was very obvious

This trail led us down towards the valley with the Arctic Circle Trail, and there we discovered where we’d gone wrong on the way up.

At the top of the first gully, we should have walked about 100m further and started to descend before turning right. There is a VERY obvious trail heading up towards the saddle if you do that, and all of the “Hard Route” trail notes suddenly make perfect sense. I guess we followed the “Super-hard-core Route” up the mountain! But it did have more spectacular views 😉

The “Medium-hard Route” is another obvious track that turns off from the Arctic Circle Trail rather than ascending up the gully. If you are hiking the Arctic Circle Trail, have time, and the weather is reasonable, I’d recommend taking this trail at the end of the hike and spending an extra night camping at the saddle of Nasaasaaq. This would allow you to climb the mountain on the way into town, rather than doing it as a day hike afterwards. Look for the cairn with both red (indicating the Arctic Circle Trail) and blue (indicating the Nasaasaaq trail) paint on it, and a trail leading off to your left as you approach Sisimiut.

Trail coming up from the Arctic Circle Trail - Nasaasaaq mountain - Sisimiut, West Greenland
The track for the “Medium-hard Route” heading down towards the Arctic Circle Trail

Recommendation

The hike to the summit of Nasaasaaq mountain is truly spectacular and a little challenging – even if you don’t take the “Super-hard-core Route”.

Both the “Hard Route” and “Medium-hard Route” have steep sections and parts where you need to scramble over rocks, but the real issue is the final ascent to the summit. If you are not good with heights or are uncertain about your abilities, do not attempt this part!! You still have amazing views over Sisimiut, the mountains along the Arctic Circle to the South, and up the Amerloq Fjord from the rocky bluff at the end of the Nasaasaaq range, so stick with that and don’t force a search and rescue operation (it is more common than you imagine!)

Trekking Information

Distance = 14.7km

Time taken = 6hr 35mins

GPX File = Hiking-Greenland-Nasaasaaq-Mountain.gpx

Strava Link =https://www.strava.com/activities/1813015128

Map

Basic Map of the route we took up Nasaasaaq Mountain near Sisimiut, West Greenland - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude Profile of the route we took up Nasaasaaq Mountain near Sisimiut, West Greenland - from Strava

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and hiking adventures here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Greenland – Sisimiut souvenir workshop

Working my way through the folder of activities at the Hotel Sisimiut, I came across a single A4 page offering the opportunity to “create your own memories” by making your own Greenlandic souvenir. 

Awesome idea! 

Image of the A4 flyer advertising the workshop - Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
I’m in!

I was super excited, because I love to make things for myself (e.g. jewelry in Nicaragua and El Salvador, a bookmark in Guatemala) but it can be quite challenging to find small workshops like this.    

The information sheet said to contact the wait-staff in the Nasaasaaq Restaurant and Brasserie, which is how I found myself following the restaurant manager through to the Conference Centre wing of the hotel a few days later.  There, he unlocked the cupboard of goodies

Image of the full cupboard of materials you can choose to work with in the Hotel Sisimiut create your own memories workshop - West Greenland
Cupboard of goodies

and explained that each of the materials was labeled with a price.  I simply had to note down how many of what materials I used on the form and then pay at the restaurant after I was finished. 

And with that, he left me to my imagination and creativity 😊

Images of some of the materials available to use in the Hotel Sisimiut Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
The labels are all in Danish but that doesn’t really matter. They also include the prices.

I’m not very good starting with a blank slate, so I studied the samples on the ideas board for inspiration.

Inspiration board for the Hotel Sisimiut create your own memories workshop - West Greenland
Inspiration

I knew I wanted to make a piece of jewelry.  I knew that I wanted to use reindeer antler and seal skin (the most Greenlandic of the items available).  What I didn’t know was how to tie knots or any other spacing/fastening techniques to allow me to create my masterpiece.  Hmmm… 

Images of the materials I chose to work with in the Sisimiut Hotel Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
The materials I decided to go with – reindeer antler, seal skin and beads

I put on Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq (the latest album from my favourite band, Nanook, who are also from Greenland) for further inspiration, and after deliberating and pondering and studying one of the pieces from the ideas board to see how knots had been used – I had my plan.  It also helped that I found a glue gun!

Image of the workspace with my materials on the table at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
The workspace is really beautiful! You can see the keyring I used to teach myself about knots over near the jars

It took another hour to actually create my Greenlandic souvenir, during which time several of the kitchen staff popped by to have a chat and check out what I was doing.  And in the end, I was ridiculously happy with the result 😊

Image of the necklace I created in the Hotel Sisimiut Greenlandic Souvenir workshop - West Greenland
My masterpiece

So much so, in fact, that I went around the hotel showing it off to all the staff I’d gotten to know so well over the previous week.  I also showed it to several guests I’d been chatting with who asked “where did you make that?”   It pays to read the folder of activities at the hotel thoroughly!

Recommendation

If you like to make things, this cool workshop offered by the Hotel Sisimiut is an awesome way to spend a few hours.  The materials available are an interesting mix that challenges your creativity, and the workspace is really beautiful.

Cost:  You pay for the materials you use so it all depends on what you create 😊  No individual item is very expensive and you can use as much or as little as you wish.  To give you an idea, my masterpiece cost a grand total of 13DKK or USD$2.

Time: As long as you want.  For me, they just unlocked the cupboard and left me with it. 

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Greenland – Sisimiut rock and mineral collection at KTI

I talk a lot about the beauty of Greenlandic rocks in my blog posts.  I also keep bemoaning the fact that I didn’t end up studying geology at university (it was either that or astronomy – I chose astronomy) and that I’m not wandering around Greenland with a geologist by my side.  So it should come as no surprise that I had to go check out the rock and mineral collection while in Sisimiut!

Housed in the foyer of the local technical college, KTI (Kalaallit Nunaanni Teknikkimik Ilinniarfik – Greenlandic is an amazing language), this is the largest collection of minerals in Greenland. 

Rock and mineral collection is location in the foyer of the technical college - Sisimiut - West Greenland
Yes, it really is located in the foyer – you just wander in! There were a bunch of students sitting at the other tables while I was visiting

It was established by Bjarne Ljungdahl (a former employee of the college) to display samples he’d collected from all over Greenland during his geological work from 1972-1981

One of the display cabinets featuring rocks and minerals in Sisimiut, West Greenland

and has expanded significantly since its inception.  The 21 display cases now include minerals from all over the world, and there are also 12 low pillars showcasing large rock samples. 

Image of the many display cases at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
You can see the large rock samples on the blue pillars between the display cases

There is one display case specifically dedicated to fossils

Display case of fossils at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland

and another to meteorite fragments.  Please tell me Australia didn’t name a meteorite after a chocolate maker!!

Meteorite from Australia on display at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
Cadbury chocolate is the most popular brand in Australia

There is also a special display case set into the wall that shows the fluorescence of several minerals.

Fluorescent minerals at the rock and mineral collection in Sisimiut, West Greenland
Minerals fluorescing under UV light

Given my lack of success in finding Tugtupit while clambouring all over Kvanefjeld in South Greenland last year, I was particularly fascinated by the large sample of this rare mineral on display here.  And equally amazed at the sheer number and diversity of minerals that can be found in Greenland.  No wonder the mining companies are trying to get in!

Greenlandic minerals, including Tugtupit, on display in Sisimiut, West Greenland
So this is what Tugtupit looks like!

The collection is very, very well done with everything labelled (in Danish) and carefully arranged in well-lit display cabinets.  If you are rock/mineral enthusiast, I have no doubt you could spend a couple of hours here.  And even if you only have a passing interest, you’ll still find a short visit worthwhile.

Recommendation

I might be biased, but I really enjoyed this collection.  To find it – enter the main door of KTI (yes, it will feel weird walking into a school but go with it) and veer around to your right.  You can’t miss it.  

Keep in mind that because it is part of a school, it is only open during school hours 🙂  And you’ll have students looking at you wondering why you are so interested in rocks!

Time: 5 mins to 5 hours depending on your interest

Cost:  Free

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Greenland – Sisimiut Arctic Sauna

Trawling the internet for things to do during my stay in Sisimiut this year, I came across the Arctic Sauna at the Hotel Sisimiut.   

Front of the Hotel Sisimiut at dusk - West Greenland
The Hotel Sisimiut is THE place to stay in Sisimiut. I had a fantastic time here with the awesome staff.

Although I’m fairly new to sauna experiences, this sounded like the perfect relaxation reward after having spent 8 days hiking the Arctic Circle Trail, and I was super-keen to give it a go.

Aqqalooraq (a very interesting young man who works on reception at the hotel) greeted me with a white fluffy towel, bathrobe, a pail of water and two pitchers of iced drinking water, and led me out the back of the hotel to where the sauna is located.

Hot tubs and sauna on the back deck of the Hotel Sisimiut in West Greenland
Can you spot the sauna?

Can you spot it in the image above?

It is actually fully self-contained within the shipping container – an idea I absolutely love!

Entryway to the Arctic Sauna at the Hotel Sisimiut in West Greenland
Entrance to the Arctic Sauna

The interior is completely lined with wood and absolutely beautiful.  There is an ante-room for relaxing, hydrating and taking a mini-break from the heat

Wood-lined ante-room of the Arctic Sauna at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland

and the hot room itself, which fits 5 people.  I hadn’t booked a private session so theoretically anyone could have come and joined me, but on this occasion I had the entire sauna to myself.

Wood-lined hot room of the Arctic Sauna at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland

Unlike many other saunas, there is no plunge pool to quickly cool off in.  And this being Summer, there was no snow to go roll around in outside.  So I just took my breaks out on the back deck of the hotel.  Trust me – it doesn’t take long for the chill of a late-August evening in Greenland to cool you down!

Places to relax and cool off on the back deck of the Hotel Sisimiut, West Greenland

Recommendation

As anticipated, the Arctic Sauna at the Hotel Sisimiut was a wonderful way to relax after an extended trek.  Next time I’m in Sisimiut, I’m also looking forward to a hot-tub experience as well (see top image) – now currently being installed.

Time:  50 mins

Cost: 150DKK (~USD$23) 

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
Like what you have read? Please follow and like me:
Traditional-Greenlandic-Buffet-explaining-spread.jpg

Traditional Greenlandic Buffet – Hotel Sisimiut

Two of my greatest joys in life are hiking and trekking, and eating excellent or interesting food.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have much of an opportunity to try traditional Greenlandic food during my 5 week visit in 2017. The best I managed was a Musk Ox Sled Dog and some whale at the amazing CaféTuaq in the Katuaq Cultural Center in Nuuk.

6 Greenlandic Tapas put together by the Katuaq Cultural Centre in Nuuk, Greenland. Shellfish salad, marinated salmon, mussels, musk-ox hotdog, prawns, and fried whale meat
Greenlandic Tapas at CaféTuaq. From top left: Shellfish salad, marinated salmon, mussels, musk-ox hot-dog, prawns, and fried whale meat

So I was very excited to see that the Hotel Sisimiut holds a surprisingly cheap Traditional Greenlandic Buffet every Saturday night! Given that I’d just finished hiking the Arctic Circle Trail (160km from Kangerlussuaq to Sisimiut), I felt completely justified in indulging to the maximum extension of my stomach. Yes, I signed up immediately 😀

Flyer for the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
This definitely caught my interest!

The wonderful head chef, Noel, allowed me to come watch the final stages of food prep in the kitchen and ask loads of questions about how the kitchen runs. It is a fascinating enterprise!

  • English is the main language spoken in the kitchen. Given that all the staff are learning or have learned English – they use their working time to also practice and perfect their skills in their third language (both Greenlandic and Danish are official languages in Greenland).
  • The kitchen is extremely busy in the morning as they prepare lunches for over 400 school children at 5 different schools.
  • They can never 100% predict what will be part of the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet, as they source their meat directly from the hunters. It all depends on what has been caught/killed in the past day or two.
Food prep in the kitchen of the Hotel Sisimiut in advance of the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet - West Greenland
Noel and his wonderful and enthusiastic staff making the final preparations for the buffet

It was a wonderful experience to learn about the behind-the-scenes at the Hotel Sisimiut kitchen and I couldn’t wait to sample the outcome!

Tyson and I were first in the dining room when the food was all laid out for the buffet. The wait-staff went through and explained what everything was, at which point Tyson decided it wasn’t for him and headed off to find something less seafood-y to eat.

Wait staff at the Nasaasaaq Restaurant and Brasserie explaining to Tyson all the different elements of the Typical Greelandic Buffet - Sisimiut, West Greenland
Tyson getting the rundown on what was what

Which was fair enough. The traditional diet in Greenland draws heavily from the ocean, so if your taste-buds agree with Tyson’s and you aren’t a fan of fish and seafood, you are limited to about a third of the offerings in the Greenlandic buffet.

I, on the other hand, decided to tackle this enormous smorgasbord in 2 waves. First up – seafood!

Seafood at the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet

Despite my best efforts to get “just a little bit of everything”, my plate still looked very full as I took it back to my table in the Nasaasaaq Restaurant and Brasserie.

My plate with the different seafoods on offer at the Greenlandic Buffet at the Hotel Sisimiut, West Greenland
A taste of each of the different seafoods at the buffet

Before me I had smoked salmon, smoked halibut, Greenlandic prawns, dried cod, dried sardines, baked cod, whale blubber and mattak – a Greenlandic delicacy of whale skin and fat.

I’m a big fan of panertut (dried fish), having been introduced to it last year on the Unplugged Wilderness Trek in East Greenland, and both the prawns and the cod baked in a curry-style sauce were delicious. But it was the whale blubber and mattak that I was most curious to try.

Read more about seafood in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Mattak

Although most of us balk at even the thought of eating whale, it is an important staple in the Greenlandic diet. Partially this is because a single whale can feed a lot of people for quite a long time, an important consideration when meat is sourced through hunting. But also because it is a very rich source of Vitamin C – something that is critical in an environment where fresh food is scarce.

Mattak comes from a narwhal or white whale and is the skin and fat of the animal with a thin layer of cartilage separating them. It is most commonly served cut into small cubes and eaten raw – exactly how it was presented at the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet.

Small glass with diced mattak - Traditional Greenlandic Buffet - Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
Mattak. The skin is the dark part and the fat the white part. The cartilage forms the boundary between the two.

It didn’t have a strong flavour but the texture took a little getting used to. While the skin and fat were quite soft, the cartilage was very hard and rubbery, an unusual sensation for me and I felt I had to be a bit careful of how hard I chewed for fear of catching the cartilage at the wrong angle. Nevertheless, I ended up eating two whole glasses of mattak, and happily accepted more when I visited a local Greenlander in their home later in the week.

Whale Blubber

While the epidermis of the whale is a key source of Vitamin C, the blubber is equally important in the Inuit diet. Not only for its calorie content in the freezing Arctic climate, but also because of the large amount of Vitamin D and Omega-3 fatty acids it contains.

Whale blubber with soy sauce and aromat

“The way we usually eat this is with some soy sauce and aromat”, explained the young waitress in perfect English as she pointed out the bottle of Kikkoman’s and a bright yellow powder.

While I appreciated the advice, I decided to eat the first piece of raw blubber “as is” to get the pure experience. It didn’t have much flavour, and I found the texture to be very soft and watery, but creamy at the same time.

I didn’t think it was so bad, so popped a second piece of raw blubber in my mouth…

… and immediately went looking for a serviette to spit it back out.

The problem was nothing to do with the food. It was the fact that between the first piece and the second piece, I had started to really think about what I was eating, and my mind had had an adverse reaction to the idea of eating blubber. After all, I’m one of those people who usually buys the leanest cuts of meat or trims all the fat off once it is cooked!

That left the third piece of blubber on my plate, and I decided it was time to try the soy sauce and aromat suggestion. The locals know what they are doing. With the addition of these two elements, I had no problem getting my last piece of blubber down, though I have to admit it is not something I would choose to eat unless I needed the vitamins!

Read more about whale as a food in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Suaasat – Seal Soup

It couldn’t be a Traditional Greenlandic Buffet without serving the national dish of Greenland – Suaasat. This is a thick soup typically made with seal meat, potatoes, onion, rice, salt and pepper, and perhaps a bay leaf.

Greenland's traditional dish - suasaat made with seal meat. Traditional Greenlandic Buffet - Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
Greenland’s national dish – suaasat

As one would expect from a dish designed to provide sustenance in frigid Arctic temperatures, it is a rich and hearty soup. It has a very slightly fishy taste, which I assume comes from the dark seal meat, but it was very tasty!

Read more about seal as a food in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Meat at the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet

Although the Greenlandic diet relies heavily on what can be caught in the ocean, the world’s largest island also has a handful of decent sized land animals – all of which were on the second plate I helped myself to at the buffet.

My plate with the different meats from land animals at theTraditional Greenlandic Buffet at the Hotel Sisimiut - West Greenland
The different land meats from Greenland: reindeer (left), musk-ox (top), and lamb (right) with potato gratin and vegetables

Lamb (Sava)

One of these was very familiar! Lamb is the meat my family ate all the time while I was growing up, and is still a favourite when I go home. Greenlandic lamb is just as delicious as Australian lamb (some experts would claim it is the best in the world!) and frozen lamb chop meals are my staple if I have access to an oven while travelling in Greenland.

Package containing a frozen lamb meal in Greenland
My go-to meal when trying to eat “cheaply” in Greenland – frozen lamb chops and veggies. This is actually enough for 3 meals for me!

The lamb are primarily raised in the south of Greenland and I saw plenty of them as I hiked the area between Narsaq and Narsarsuaq last year. And although the lamb of my plate was wonderfully cooked, I was far more interested to taste the other two meats.

Read more about lamb as a food in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Musk-Ox (Umimmak )

Although I’d tried a musk-ox hot-dog last year, I was keen to try a less manipulated version of the meat.

Musk Ox Hotdog with chips and salad at the Katuaq Cultural Centre in Nuuk, Greenland
Musk-ox hot-dog at CaféTuaq in Nuuk

It turned out that musk-ox was actually my favourite of the 3 meats! The taste was enhanced by careful selection of herbs and was nowhere near as strong as what I’d experienced with the hot-dog. It was perfectly cooked, juicy, and yes – I may have gone back for seconds … and thirds!

Read more about musk-ox as a food in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Reindeer (Tuttu)

The third meat on the plate was reindeer, the favourite of Noel, the head chef. He was telling me while I was in the kitchen that reindeer meat is very lean, so the fat must be left on while cooking to ensure it is as tender as possible.

Reindeer - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
I hope it wasn’t this reindeer we saw along the Arctic Circle Trail that ended up on my plate!

Certainly, it was not as tender as the other two meats, and although it was very mild at first taste, a stronger gamy flavour developed as an after-taste.

Read more about reindeer as a food in Greenland at A Taste of Greenland.

Recommendation

If you are interested in trying new foods and/or are looking for an unlimited amount of food for a great price in Sisimiut, you must try to time your visit to coincide with the Hotel Sisimiut’s Traditional Greenlandic Buffet.

All the food was immaculately prepared and presented, and they had to almost roll me out of the restaurant I had eaten so much! I suggest not eating lunch 🙂

Cost: 275DKK (~USD$42) for all you can eat

Time: as long as you want to keep eating. I took about 2 hours before I couldn’t fit anything else in.

Something cool: check out the Greenlandic Food Infographic from Visit Greenland

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Trekking Greenland – Arctic Circle Trail -Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord to Sisimiut

Last day on the Arctic Circle Trail.  Hard to believe it is over already!

Tyson and I were up early (well, for us anyway) for a 7am departure.  It was 22km to Sisimiut and we wanted to get there just after lunch to ensure we managed to secure a bunk at the hostel.  No more drafty tent for us!  Well, me anyway.  Tyson was still deciding where he would stay.

It was an absolutely glorious morning

[move cursor over the image to see the full panorama]

as we said goodbye to our new German friend 

Leaving the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord Hut - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Heading away from the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord Hut

and chose-our-own-adventure across the spongy ground and up to the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Sud Hut.

Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Sud Hut - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Approach (top) to the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Sud Hut (bottom)

Beyond there, the trail followed the fjord for a while, and it was incredible to finally be hiking in the sunshine under blue skies.

Overlooking the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq fjord - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Taking in the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq fjord under brilliant skies!

After about 5km, the trail turned away from the fjord and started to ascend steeply, following a river to the highest pass along the route.

Final pass on Day 8 - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Trail up to the final pass of the Arctic Circle Trail

Towards the top, we came across a toilet with one of the best views in the world

Toilet with stunning view over the lake on day 8 - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Toilet with a view!

before continuing over the pass for the downhill run to Sisimiut. 

Random things along the trail indicated that we were getting close to civilisation again 

Random things along the Arctic Circle Trail heading into Sisimiut - West Greenland
And old dog sledge (top-left) and a fork stuck in the ground (middle) were two of the weird objects we found as approached the outskirts of Sisimiut

but the Arctic Circle Trail had one last epic natural vista for us 🙂 

A clear view into the valley at the base of the impressive mountains (including the iconic Nasaasaaq) just outside of Sisimiut. 

View of Nasaasaaq from the pass - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Another of my favourite views along the trek was just outside of Sisimiut

Yet another highlight of the trek!

Unfortunately we couldn’t spend too much time admiring the view, as a freezing wind had come up (I even had my thick, wind-proof gloves on!) and I was even more motivated to get to the hostel early to secure a bed.

After one final river crossing and a quick lunch on the other side

Final river crossing - Day 8 of the Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Tyson getting ready to change back into hiking shoes for the last time

we began hiking through the valley we had admired from on high

Hiking into the valley below  Nasaasaaq - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Hiking into the valley below Nasaasaaq

and finally saw our first glimpse of our final destination.

Sisimiut airport just glimpsed from the Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Can you spot the buildings at Sisimiut airport?

The trail turned into a road a few kilometres further on

From trail to road on the outskirts of Sisimiut - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
Where the Arctic Circle Trail ends and the road into town begins

and this seemed to go on for-absolutely-ever as it led us eventually into town.

Entering Sisimiut - Arctic Circle Trail - West Greenland
The never-ending dirt road (top) finally gave way to bitumen (bottom) at the top of Sisimiut. Almost there!

We headed straight for the Sisimiut Hostel, only to discover that it was not open until 4:30pm.  It was 2pm.  So much for arriving early!

In another impulsive change of plan, Tyson suggested we head back to the Hotel Sisimiut – the best hotel in town.  We had seen an advertisement for their “hiker’s special” on the way into Sisimiut and, given that we needed 3 nights of accommodation and would share a room, it wouldn’t actually be much more expensive for each of us than staying at the hostel.

Sign with deals for Arctic Circle Trail hikers at the entrance to Sisimiut - West Greenland
The hiker’s offer at the Hotel Sisimiut was very appealing!

Bad news when we arrived – they didn’t have any more of their double rooms left with the “hiker’s special” 🙁 However, they did offer us the business suite at a very good rate and, in the end, Tyson and I decided to throw Danish Kroner to the wind and enjoy a little luxury 🙂 

Read more about hiking the Arctic Circle Trail

If this post has piqued your curiosity about hiking and trekking in Greenland, read about the rest of my adventure over 8 days on the Arctic Circle Trail:

If it has sparked an interest in Greenland more generally, learn more about this amazing country at Visit Greenland, and check out the wide range of tours of all kinds (not just hiking and trekking) at Guide to Greenland.

Trekking Information

Distance = 25.8 km

Time taken = 8hrs 19mins

GPX File =Arctic-Circle-Trail-Kangerlusarsuq-Tulleq-Nord-Sisimiut.gpx

Strava Link =https://www.strava.com/activities/1813015249

Map

Basic Map of the route from the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord Hut to Sisimiut on the Arctic Circle Trail, West Greenland - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude Profile of the route from the Kangerlusarsuk Tulleq Nord Hut to Sisimiut on the Arctic Circle Trail, West Greenland - from Strava
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Greenland – Sisimiut Sea Safari

I was on my third cup of tea over breakfast at the Hotel Sisimiut when Jan from Sisimiut Private Boat Safari called.  Yes, it was unbelievably foggy outside, but some of the calmest waters occur after a heavy fog lifts he told me – so could I be ready in 15 minutes?

Absolutely!

bacon, eggs and coffee for breakfast at the Hotel Sisimiut, West Greenland

I loved the breakfasts at the Hotel Sisimiut!

We’d been waiting a couple of days for the waters to be calm enough to set out on a “Sea Safari” around Sisimiut.  As the name suggests, the goal is to spot and observe the marine animals that are so plentiful in the fjords and off the coast of Greenland.  Seals and whales in particular are very common but, as with any safari, there are no guarantees…

Down at the harbour I once again donned the freezer suit that I’d worn on the trip to the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq the day before, and off we set.

Me in a freezer suit on the boat with Jan - Sisimiut - West Greenland

I was rugged up – nice and warm!

Heading out of Sisimiut you pass several small islands which are used by locals as “holiday islands” for their Greenlandic sled dogs.  The name stems from the fact that the dogs are free to roam the island as they please, a welcome change from being chained up all summer!

Pack of 5 Greenlandic Sled Dogs on and island off Sisimiut, West Greenland

Greenlandic Sled Dogs racing down the island to say “aluu” to us

It was stunningly beautiful out on the almost mirror-like water as we set about looking for wildlife.

Jan with binoculars scanning the ocean for wildlife from his boat - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Jan on the lookout for marine mammals

Though I was also captivated by the low fog that lay across the water, at times completely obscuring the horizon line.

Image of fog over water where it difficult to tell where one ends and the other begins - Sisimiut Sea Safari - West Greenland

Fog and water – where does one end and the other begin?

Unfortunately, despite the calm seas and our best efforts – there were simply no animals to be seen!  The chatter on the radio told us we weren’t the only ones having problems.  The local hunters were checking in with each other and reporting their unanimous bad luck in Greenlandic.  In almost 4 hours on the water, we managed to spot only a handful of individual seals that promptly disappeared as soon as we approached.

head of a seal poking out of the ocean - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Hello! One of the handful of lone seals we saw

That was it.

Well, apart from the sea birds that is 😊

The two main types of sea birds we saw on the safari out of Sisimiut, West Greenland

The two main types of sea birds we saw on the Sea Safari

Although this was disappointing, it is the nature of animal safaris the world over.  Sometimes you are unlucky when the animals don’t play the game!

We decided to abandon the search for animals for a while and Jan took me over to Nipisat Island – home to one of the most well-studied archaeological sites in this part of Greenland.  Extensively excavated between 1989 and 1994, the dig uncovered more than 70,000 bone fragments and 1,000 artefacts (including 314 tools) from the Saqqaq culture (~2500 – 1500BC).  If you are keen to learn more – you can read the full report by Anne Birgitte Gotfredsen and Tinna Møbjerg online 😊 

What remains now is a low, rectangular stone wall, partially covered in vegetation, that stands watch over the sea.

Two views of what remains of the Saqqaq Culture archaeological site on Nipisat Island near Sisimiut, West Greenland

Views of the archaeological remains left by the Saqqaq culture on Nipisat Island

After hiking up to the top of the island for an amazing view

Panorama from the top of Nipisat Island near Sisimiut in West Greenland

[move mouse over image to see the full panorama]

it was back in the boat for more tea

my gloved hand holding a cup of hot tea on the boat - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Hot tea was a very welcome part of our Sea Safari

while we made our way around to a beautiful white shell beach

 

View of the white shell beach near Sisimiut, West Greenland

The white shell beach was very isolated and hidden

and past the abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk, where Jan used to have a summer home.

Derelict buildings in the abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk near Sisimiut, West Greenland

The abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk

Unfortunately, we still had no luck with the animals on the way back to Sisimiut, though Jan never stopped searching!

Recommendation

One of the best ways to get close views of marine animals is on a sea safari in a small boat.  Unfortunately, I was very unlucky on this occasion (apparently there were seals everywhere 2 days later!) but it was still an amazing experience to be out on the water for an extended period of time. 

The freezer suit that Jan provides kept me warm for the whole 4 hours (and trust me, I feel the cold!) so you just have to make sure you have a good beanie, gloves and warm shoes to guarantee your comfort.

Cost:  Depends on the amount of time spent.  Have a look at the Sisimiut Private Boat Safari website for details.

Time: 4 hours

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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2019 Akisuanerit Festival – Nuuk

After 2 long years of waiting, I finally got to see my absolute favourite band in all the world – Nanook – play as part of the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk. Featuring both domestic and international artists and a wide range of musical styles, this 3-day music festival is one of the biggest in Greenland and a great place to discover musicians from the world’s largest island.

My favourite band – Nanook

Nanook were one of the first acts to be announced for this year’s festival, and I think I may have been first in line to buy a ticket to the Saturday night when they were released. There was no way I was going to miss them this time! The added bonus was that another of my favourite Greenlandic performers – Kimmernaq – was also scheduled to play the same night, as was the headline performer – Danish artist, MØ.

Akisuanerit Festival – arriving at Katuaq

Months after buying the ticket, the big night finally arrived.  Determined to reclaim “the spot” I had occupied for the Ole Kristiansen concert in the Katuaq Foyer earlier in the year (one of the best places for short people like me), I rushed my friends through dinner and out the door so that we would arrive early.

Lineup poster for the Akisuanerit Festival 2019 in Nuuk, Greenland
Program for Akisuanerit 2019

Unfortunately, I had not read the schedule very closely and we found the doors still firmly locked when we arrived at 8:30pm. I thought the first act was scheduled for 9pm, but it turned out that was when the doors would be opened.

Oops! 

I wasn’t the only one to be making my friends stand out in the cold, however. Elaine – a 68 year old lady from Florida and another enormous Nanook fan – was also stranded outside.  When we were finally let in, I headed straight for “the spot” and claimed it with no worries at all. But I think my friends will double-check anything written in Danish next time before taking my word for it 🙂

Akisuanerit Festival – Kimmernaq and Adam

The first performers of the night were Greenlandic singer Kimmernaq and her brother Adam. I’d come across Kimmernaq about a year ago and immediately fell in love with her amazing voice and many of the songs off her two albums. Perhaps this isn’t surprising given her second album was written by Frederik Elsner from Nanook!

Covers of Kimmernaq's 2 album

I had heard her songs performed by many local musicians in towns and settlements around Greenland, but I was really excited to actually hear her in person. She was fab!

Kimmernaq and her brother Adam playing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk 2019
Kimmernaq and Adam

She sang a mixture of songs during her performance, including many of her own as well as a few Radiohead covers that allowed her and her brother to harmonize gloriously. Adam turned out to be an incredible singer in his own right, performing a solo, melancholic folk-style song that aligned exactly with the type of music I love. What an incredible start to the night!

Adam, Kimmernaq and Nathan performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Adam, Kimmernaq and Nathan

Their set culminated in an amazing hip-hop collaboration with several other Greenlandic artists, including Nina Kreutzmann Jørgensen, Pilu Lynge and Da Bartali Crew. Something very different to her usual stuff – and seriously, seriously awesome! Yes, even for someone who is not into hip-hop music.

Adam, Kimmernaq, Nina, Pilu and Da Bartali Crew performing a hip-hop collaboration at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Adam, Kimmernaq, Da Bartali Crew (back), Nina and Pilu performing their hip-hop collaboration

Buy music from Kimmernaq at: Atlantic Music Shop, iTunes


Akisuanerit Festival – Nanook

Next up was the band I had come to see – Nanook. I discovered their music about 2 years ago when I was living in Ecuador and have listened to almost nothing else ever since! If you’ve been following me for a while, you will have seen my blog posts about them both here and on Guide to Greenland 🙂  I had been trying to see them play live since 2017 (I missed them by less than 12 hours in Sisimiut in 2018) and I finally got the chance here in Nuuk.

Nanook official image

The wait was totally worth it!

They started out with the amazing soundscape of Minguitsuugami – one of my favourite tracks off their latest album, Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq – and played a mixture of old and new songs from their 11-year career.

Greenlandic band - Nanook - performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Nanook

There is something really special about seeing your favourite musicians play live, and it can only be surpassed when they actually give you a shout-out/name-drop in the middle of their performance 🙂  One of the highlights of my year!

I love these guys!

Buy music from Nanook at:  Atlantic Music, Amazon (Nanook, Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq), iTunes, Spotify


Akisuanerit Festival – Tarrak

A surprise addition to the program was Greenlandic rapper, Tarrak. Performing with KimoJax, they sang his controversial hit “Tupilak” – a song that highlights some of the difficult aspects of the relationship between Greenland and Denmark.

Tarrak and KimoJax performing Tupilak at the Akisuanerit Festival, Nuuk 2019
Tarrak (left) and KimoJax (right) performing “Tupilak”

The linked YouTube clip includes an English translation of the lyrics, and although I am not a fan of rap, I think this song is amazing.

Akisuanerit Festival – Julie

Julie Berthelsen is one of the biggest Greenlandic pop singers, and insanely popular judging by the reaction of the masses who had packed into the foyer of the Katuaq Cultural Center by this time.

Julie singing her very popular songs at Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Julie

Personally, her music is not my cup of tea. But I have to admit to liking the song “League of Light” which she sang with Nina Kreutzmann Jørgensen as Greenland’s entry to the Danish qualifier for Eurovision 2019. Nina joined her on stage again at the Akisuanerit Festival to finish off her set with this number.

Akisuanerit Festival –

The headline act for the 2019 festival was internationally famous Danish singer, . To be honest, I had no idea who MØ was or what her music sounded like (yes, I can be a little behind the times), but given I was there I figured I should stay awake, stick around and give her a go.

She. Was. Amazing!

MØ performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk 2019
MØ was fabulous

She didn’t appear until about 1:20am, but when she did, her energy and stage presence were amazing and her vocals were flawless. I’m now a massive fan!

MØ and her band playing in Katuaq, Nuuk

Summary

For a person who normally goes to bed around 10pm, this was a huge night! MØ finished at 2:30am and I had a 30-minute walk to get home afterwards. Even then, I found it difficult to fall asleep. Between the ringing in my ears and the high of finally seeing Nanook play live – my brain would not let go of the awesome night.

If you are a music lover and also interested in visiting Greenland – perhaps try to plan your trip for end-September/start-October so you can catch the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk. Like the festival’s Facebook page to stay up to date with the latest news, and check out the Ultimate Guide to Nuuk to discover what else there is to see and do while you visit Greenland’s capital.

Discover more about Greenland

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk provides a complete list of festivals that take place throughout the year in Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, where to eat, and what to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Sarfalik Restaurant Tasting Menu – Nuuk

The Tasting Menu at Sarfalik Restaurant in Nuuk offers a fine-dining experience that allows you to enjoy a wide variety of Greenlandic produce in the one sitting. Professional chefs take the abundances of the season and prepare innovative dishes using a variety of modern techniques for a truly unique taste of Greenland.

In the 2.5 months I’ve been based in Nuuk, I’ve not once been out to a restaurant or café to eat. Cooking for myself is so ingrained (it has to be after more than 3 years of traveling and watching every cent) that I usually forget that going out for a meal is even an option!

However, having written the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk where I relied on restaurant reviews and the recommendations of my friends and colleagues in order to write the “Where to Eat” section, I decided that I had to go out and try one of these places before leaving. I chose to head to the top of the Hotel Hans Egede and indulge in the “Greenlandic Tasting Menu” at Sarfalik Restaurant.

Those of you who have been reading my blog for a while now know how much I love eating and trying new foods. For example, the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet at the Hotel Sisimiut and the Foodie Tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik were two of my travel highlights for 2018. Needless to say, I was really looking forward to the experience as Nicolai (from Denmark) seated me at a table by the window with a view to one of the well-known mountains near Nuuk – Store Malene.

Sunset over Store Malene from Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk- West Greenland
Sunset on Store Malene (the tallest of the peaks) as seen from Sarfalik Restaurant

Before the Tasting Menu begins

As I unwrapped the napkin from its strip of binding sealskin, Nicolai placed a “snack” down in front of me. Humpback whale with soy marinade and mustard mayo, and seaweed with a little onion mayo.

Humpback whale snack at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
Humpback whale with soy marinade and mustard mayo, and seaweed with a little onion mayo

Although many people would balk at eating whale, it is very much a part of life in Greenland. Mattak (the raw skin of certain types of whale) used to provide the Inuit with several important nutrients, and is still a delicacy that is served at Kaffemiks (celebrations) in modern times.

I’ve tried whale meat on a few occasions in both Greenland and Iceland and have always really enjoyed it.  This was no exception. The meat was melt-in-the-mouth tender with a subtle soy flavor. It was a great start to what I expected to be an amazing experience.

Next to appear on the table was a basket of warm bread. The white rolls had a wonderfully crusty exterior, and the malt rolls had a more cake-like texture with a rich taste that was enhanced by the salt crystals sprinkled on top. When loaded up with chive butter, keeping my hand out the bread basket was very difficult, even though I knew I had to.

Two types of bread at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
How to resist?!

Now for the Tasting Menu

The first real course of the Tasting Menu (no, we hadn’t even started yet!) was delivered by Åsmund from Norway. It was an Italian-inspired musk ox empanada with rosemary mayo. There had been an “Italian Takeover” of Sarfalik Restaurant during the previous two weeks by visiting chefs, and this dish was created based on what they showcased during their stay.

Musk-ox empanada as part of the Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk - West Greenland
Musk ox empanada with rosemary mayo

One of the interesting things about the Tasting Menu is that it changes several times per year according to the produce that is in season. However, because it is made up of several small portions, there is also the flexibility to mix it up when an interesting opportunity arises.  

Åsmund (who has a touch of an Australian accent despite never having worked in Australia?!) also presented me with the next dish – reindeer tenderloin with celeriac. The tenderloin was cured with sage and the half-ring of celeriac underneath it was pickled in red wine vinegar and hibiscus. Celeriac cream, crunchy sage “chips” and sprinkled dried Angelica topped off the dish. Åsmund explained that normally the celeriac cream would also have had fresh sage in it, but they were having supply issues. One example of the challenges faced by even a high-end restaurant in Greenland.

reindeer tenderloin with celeriac  on the tasting menu at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
Reindeer tenderloin with celeriac

The reindeer was very smooth and tender with a mild taste of jerky. Delicious! I was less a fan of the celeriac, but that’s just because I don’t enjoy the taste of wine. The cream gave me a hint of what celeriac tastes like (I’d not eaten it before) and I look forward to another opportunity to try it in its more natural state.

Next up was cold smoked humpback whale with turnip presented in 3 ways.

Cold smoked humpback whale - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk -West Greenland
Cold smoked humpback whale with turnip

The whale was smoked in-house and had a texture more like that of raw fish than what I would normally associate with meat. Its colour was also very dark and Åsmund went on to explain that while this is a general characteristic of humpback whale meat, the cold smoking process (and lack of exposure to heat) actually makes it darker.

The turnips offered 3 completely different experiences of this root vegetable. The fermented turnips (triangles) were quite acidic and sharp, the pickled turnip (julienne) was also quite sharp but somehow had a sweetness to it too. The roasted turnip puree was very creamy and, for me, had the strongest and most recognizable turnip flavor.

My next course was bought out by Matthias from Argentina. Nicolai had told me that Matthias usually doesn’t get to do front-of-house because he is not very confident with his English. But given I speak Spanish…

The plate that Matthias put in front of me was burnt cod with Greenlandic herbs and roasted tomato sauce. Matthias introduced it to me in Spanish, wished me pleasant eating, and disappeared quickly back into the kitchen.

Burnt Cod - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk Greenland
Burnt cod with Greenlandic herbs

The cod was perfectly cooked and the roasted tomato sauce very creamy. Like everything that had come before, it was delicious, though I was starting to worry about the fact that portion sizes seemed to be growing! I crossed my fingers I would be able to fit everything in.  And yes. I was still managing to resist the lure of the bread.

Meeting the head chef – Simon

The next person to appear at my table with an orange granatine palette cleanser turned out to be the head chef, Simon. He is originally from Sweden (the kitchen is very multicultural) and had been working at Sarfalik for 2.5 years, 1.5 of those as head chef. He was much younger than I expected and I was looking forward to chatting with him about the inspiration for and challenges of putting together a Tasting Menu such as this in Greenland.

Orange Granitine - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk - West Greenland
Orange granatine

He returned with my main dish – musk ox with grilled sweet potato, musk ox souffle and musk ox glace – and said he’d be happy to chat after I’d enjoyed my meal.

This dish was fantastic! The musk ox was like a fine steak cooked to perfection. The glace, beautifully rich. And the elements on the plate aligned with the Greenlandic tradition of not wasting anything.  The glace was made using the bones of the musk ox. The puree and chips were made from the castoffs of the grilled sweet potato. I love this approach.

Main dish – Spring Tasting Menu

Musk Ox with Grilled Sweet Potato - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk Greenland
Musk ox with grilled sweet potato

Once I’d finished eating, Simon joined me at my table while we waited for the dessert to be ready. He explained the idea behind the Tasting Menu – to create high quality food that works with the abundances and limitations of the current season in Greenland and neighboring countries.

For example, February is musk ox hunting season in Greenland, so the main today was a musk ox plate. Later in the year during reindeer hunting season, the Tasting Menu would instead feature a reindeer-based main dish. Right now, root vegetables (the staples of Nordic countries) support whatever meat is available (though this, too, will change as the seasons change), and locally sourced herbs that grow wild in the backcountry around Nuuk (like Angelica) are used whenever possible.

“The goal is to tell a story with the Tasting Menu”, Simon tells me.

A story that is dictated by the season.  A story that features local produce sourced directly from the fishermen and hunters while acknowledging Nordic influences on Greenland. A story that showcases the multicultural nature of Nuuk through the use of different cooking techniques drawn from the countries of origin and experiences of the kitchen staff of Sarfalik Restaurant.

I was very much looking forward to how the last chapter of today’s story would unfold!

Spring Tasting Menu dessert

When Simon returned, he came bearing a magnificent Chervil-based dessert. The menu describes it as the following: “Chervil and cream cheese ice cream with yoghurt crisps, liquorice sprinkles, and chervil grass”, but I prefer the story that Simon told me about it.

Nuuk Spring - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - West Greenland
Nuuk Spring

It symbolizes Spring in Nuuk. The green represents plants starting to grow and the brown (burnt white chocolate), the dirt that is slowly revealed by the melting snow. However, just like the Spring we have been experiencing during my stay, a period of warmer weather is abruptly interrupted by a cold snap, and fresh snow (the white fluff) once again covers the landscape.

Brilliant!

And delicious!

The chervil cream cheese ice cream was silky smooth and creamy with a mild flavor that was offset by the much stronger chervil syrup. The yoghurt chips were crisp and almost toffee-like, and the thyme snow (it was meant to be chervil snow, but again, supply problems) was lighter and fluffier than sherbet and disintegrated immediately upon contact with my tongue. I didn’t think anything could dissolve more readily than sherbet, but I have been proven wrong!

It was a spectacular end to an amazing meal that was further enhanced as the setting sun momentarily peaked out from underneath the cloud layer to bathe the restaurant in incredible golden light. Moments like this are truly magical.

Golden sunset through Sarfalik Restaurant on top of the Hotel Hans Egede in Nuuk - West Greenland
Golden sunset through Sarfalik Restaurant on top of the Hotel Hans Egede

Recommendation

The Tasting Menu at Sarfalik Restaurant in Nuuk is a wonderful way to try local Greenlandic ingredients prepared in innovative ways. The small portion sizes and large number of courses mean you get to taste a wide range of produce, all prepared with the imagination and ingenuity of top professional chefs. There is also the option to pair the menu with a carefully chosen wine selection.

A million thanks to Simon, Åsmund, Nicolai and Matthias for looking after me and a wonderful experience. I look forward to returning again in September to try to the Autumn version of the Tasting Menu!

Discover more about Greenland

For recommendations on where to eat in Nuuk, check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk – the best resource on the web for those planning a trip to Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, and all the things to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

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