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Hiking Iceland – In the Shadow of Vatnajökull – Day 2

It is always a good idea to get up for sunrise … even when it occurs at 3am!  

Sunrise at Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Sunrise at Geldingafell Hut

It is also a good idea to go back to bed afterwards, and when we finally crawled out for our 8am breakfast, we were greeted with bright blue skies and loads of sunshine.

Geldingafell Hut and its surroundings - East Iceland

Geldingafell Hut with its pyramid-shaped outhouse, and the snow-capped Mt Snæfell on the left.

We helped ourselves to a spread of muesli, crackers, jam, peanut butter, nutella, tea and coffee to fuel our day, and then made our lunches with the same ingredients plus Icelandic Flatbrauð (rye flat bread), other long-lasting breads, cheese (Brie, Gouda), capsicum cream cheese, and a variety of processed meats – including hangikjöt, Icelandic smoked lamb.  Plus a couple of chocolate bars for energy 😉

Making breakfast on an Icelandic Mountain Guides trek

After cleaning the hut, returning unused supplies to the “store”, closing the wooden shutters over the windows to protect against wild weather, and locking the door behind us, we headed off across country for Day 2 of our trek in the shadow of Vatnajökull.

Leaving Geldingafell Hut on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Leaving Geldingafell Hut for Day 2 of our hike

The awesome weather meant that we could take the route closest to the glacier, so this would be a long day of hiking.  There were no tracks at all, and we spent the whole day walking across ankle-turning shaley rock, or ankle-turning pumicey rock.  Ankle-turning either way, and I highly recommend you wear really good waterproof hiking boots with ankle support for this trek!

Different types of rocks on the In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Shale (top) and pumice (bottom)

For the first hour or so we had a perfect view of Mt Snæfell, if we looked behind us.  It often pays to turn around while you are hiking 🙂

View of Mt Snæfell on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Apparently our driver yesterday mentioned to Þorbjörg that he’d never seen the mountain this cloud-free for so many days during a Summer.  Apparently, while Reykjavik has been struggling under the cloudiest Summer in 100 years, the weather in the East of Iceland has been the opposite!

We hiked beside a series of lakes and through pockets of snow, before spying the next glacier tongue coming down from the Icefield.

Lakes and snow on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Our lunch-stop was on a high perch looking down onto the face of the glacier (does it look like the head of a fish to you too?) and the deep valley that its meltwater was carving out of the East Iceland landscape.

Glacier views on Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Given the sunshine and lack of wind, we had a very relaxed lunch while admiring the view, before setting off again in the direction of the mountains we could see in the distance.

Scenery on day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

We were able to cross most of the streams/rivers by stone hopping (I’m so glad I’ve started using trekking poles)

Rock hopping across another stream on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

but eventually came to one that defeated us.  Þorbjörg wasn’t sure how deep it was and whether we would be able to cross or whether we would have to walk around.  So she told us to hold off on changing our shoes while she “tested the waters” as it were.  I love guided treks 🙂

Testing the depth of the water on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Þorbjörg finding a route across the river

In the end, she decided we would cross the river, as it only came up to lower-thigh on her (at least mid-thigh for myself, Melinda and Maria).  She suggested that we take off our hiking pants and wade across in our undies, putting our waterproof pants on if we really felt the cold badly.

Wading across the river in underwear on Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Eric and Maria making their way across the river

My second river crossing in my underwear since arriving in Iceland!

Obstacle overcome, we put our pants back on, dried our feet, re-shoed, and  continued our journey over the rocky terrain in the direction of our next hut.  BTW it turns out Martin and Wolf walked a little further around and crossed the river on a snow bridge.  But I reckon you haven’t really hiked in Iceland until you can say you’ve stripped to your underwear to ford a river 🙂

I was completely mesmerised by the colours and patterns in the cliff face on the opposite side of the valley, once again wishing I was hiking with a geologist.  And although Þorbjörg was great at explaining the basics of how the geology of the region formed, I’m absolutely fascinated by rocks and really want to dive more into the details.

Patterned geology of East Iceland on Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek

Eventually, Egilssel Hut appeared in the distance as a white spec overlooking a lake. 

Approaching Egilssel Hut on Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Can you see Egilssel Hut?

We passed some woolly locals and, unfortunately, the Icelandic flies also found us!  Not quite as bad as the flies I encountered in Greenland, but still annoying – especially after not having had to endure them for a long time.

Icelandic Sheep along our path

Icelandic sheep roam free in East Iceland

Egilssel Hut is much larger than Geldingafell, and it turned out we were to share it with 3 Icelandic ladies this night. 

Inside Egilssel Hut - Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Inside Egilssel Hut

While our Icelandic companions finished preparing their evening meal and some of our group went for a quick and cold wash in the lake, I wandered around taking photos of an amazing basaltic outcrop with columnar jointing (I remember that much from 1st year Geology).  I love these structures! The last one I went to see was at Los Tercios near Suchitoto in El Salvador.

Columnar Jointing along the river at Egilssel Hut - Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

Dinner was a thick, delicious cauliflower soup followed by couscous and canned ham.  This latter brought back all sorts of memories from when I was a little girl and my family would buy ham in this way since it was cheap and would last in the cupboard. I don’t know how cheap it is in Iceland (is anything cheap in Iceland?) but the fact it will last in the food cache at the hut is the important thing for Icelandic Mountain Guides.  

Eating dinner at Egilssel Hut - Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek - East Iceland

We finished our meal with a dessert of chocolate biscuits and then sat around chatting and drinking tea, coffee and hot chocolate until bed. 

I did wait up again for sunset … but unfortunately it was disappointing this night 🙁   Ah well, maybe tomorrow!

Trekking Information

Distance = 17.13km

Time taken = 8 hours 25 minutes

Map

Basic Map of Day 2 of In the Shadow of Vatnajokull - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude profile of Day 2 of Shadow of Vatnajokull from Strava

Read more about hiking In the Shadow of Vatnajökull

If this post has piqued your curiosity, read about the rest of the 4-day trek “In the Shadow of Vatnajökull” with Icelandic Mountain Guides

Alternatively, check out my other posts about hiking and trekking in Iceland and around the world.

 

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Hiking Iceland – In the Shadow of Vatnajökull – Day 1

My trip to East Iceland started out a little too early in the morning and I’m thankful for 2 things:

  1. the fact that it never gets dark here in the summer makes it easier to drag oneself out of bed at 5:30am
  2. I’m staying very close to Reykjavik domestic airport and didn’t have to get up even earlier

Daniel, the Icelandic Mountain Guides representative, met myself, Eric and Melinda (from the US) at the airport to ensure we had everything and there were no issues, and I promptly fell back to sleep for the 50 minute Air Iceland Connect flight to Egilsstaðir as soon as I was clipped into seat 1C.  I’ve never sat in the first row in a plane before!

We arrived on time and were met off the plane by Þorbjörg Þorvaldsdóttir.   I’m terrible with names in the first place, and Icelandic place and people names are really challenging me!  But thankfully she explained “just think of Thor and then the famous Icelandic singer, Björk, and put them together”.   Ah!  That made it very easy 🙂   And I learned that the Icelandic letter “Þ” is pronounced essentially like “th” in English!

The airport was actually the meeting place for the whole group, and we soon met Wolfgang and Sabine (a couple from Germany), Martin and Wolf (father and son from Germany), and Maria (from France).  Introductions done, we did a pitstop at the local Nettó supermarket for fresh supplies for the next 4 days, made our lunch on the picnic table near the carpark, dropped off some luggage that would be transferred to the end of the hike for us, and then were on our way to the start point of our trek.

We had all signed up for the 4-day lightweight-backpacking trek: “In the Shadow of Vatnajökull” in East Iceland.  The name aptly describes the trek, which travels down the remote eastern edge of  Europe’s largest glacier – Vatnajökull.  The “lightweight backpacking” part meant that although we would be staying in huts where sleeping bags and mats were provided and where Icelandic Mountain Guides had food caches, we would need to carry our clothing, sleeping bag liner, anything else we deemed essential, and a portion of the fresh food for the 4 day trek.   

It was a pretty grey old day with low clouds, so there were not many views as we traveled firstly along the edge of a fjord and then up to a higher plateau in the direction of Mt Snæfell (“The Snow Mountain”), the highest mountain in Iceland outside of a glacier region. 

Driving to the trailhead - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Driving to the trailhead in our minivan. No. That is not Mt Snæfell. It is still in the distance, its peak covered in snow. Note the the lack of fences – Icelandic sheep roam free in the East.

After about an hour, our driver pulled off to the side of the road and stopped.  Once we’d all piled out with our gear, he promptly took off back the way we’d come, leaving us standing in what seemed to be the middle of nowhere.  Þorbjörg quickly assured us that it was all good, and pulled out the map to show us the plan for today and the next 3 days.

Getting dropped at the trailhead of - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

We then set off across rocky, unmarked land (there was no trail to follow) as we hiked along the edge of one of Iceland’s many water storage dams.  

Hikers walking past wildflowers in front of a water storage dam - - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

One of the most impressive features we came across in this rather flat terrain was a rocky outcrop that allowed us a slightly elevated view of the landscape.  We managed to find a spot that was more-or-less protected from the wind to have lunch, and Þorbjörg surprised us with a snack of Kleiner – yummy Icelandic donuts.

Lunch spot and Kleinur - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

I’m not a huge fan of doughnuts, but these were delicious! Even cold!

Despite our relatively sheltered position, it was quite cold.  So after I hurriedly ate my sandwich, I kept myself moving by taking photos of the surroundings

View from lunch spot - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

The view from our slightly elevated lunch spot

and all the nearby wildflowers.  There were quite a few!

Wildflowers - East Iceland

We were slowly making our way towards one of the glacier tongues of Vatnajökull, at the base of which sat our home for the evening – Geldingafell Hut.

Hikers walking towards Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Can you spot the little yellow hut?

But before we arrived, we started to come across swathes of bright green moss growing in the wetter areas of the lava field.  Its vividness amidst the almost monochrome volcanic rock was startling and I loved how it held the water droplets so carefully in its embrace.

Bright green moss holding drops of water - - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Unfortunately, not all was well with parts of this green carpet, and Þorbjörg also pointed out some “witches circles” caused by a fungus that attacks the moss in a circular pattern.

Our guide explaining how "witches circles" are formed

Those who have been following my hiking adventures in Patagonia, Iceland and Greenland know how much I “love” cold river crossings.  Day 1 placed two of these in our path.  But now I have my neoprene socks – I have no fear!  🙂

Crossing a river - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Thank goodness for neoprene socks!

There were a few small snow drifts to navigate (nothing compared to what we had on the Icefjords and Remote Villages trek in East Greenland) on the final uphill to the hut, and Þorbjörg welcomed us to our home for the night by tasking us with opening all the shutters that protect the windows from wild weather.

Approaching, and arriving at Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Approaching (top) and arriving at (bottom) the Geldingafell Hut. You can see the glacier tongue above the hut in the top image.

Geldingafell Hut is very small and cosy inside – especially for 9 people.  There is nowhere really to sit except for on the bunks, which is why we were all very happy that the skies finally cleared and the Sun started shining brightly just after we arrived!

View of hut and river valley from behind - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

The Geldingafell Hut has an amazing view over a beautiful river valley. The pyramid-shaped building at bottom left is the outhouse

I decided to go for a short hike up the hill behind the hut before dinner to get a clearer view of the glacier and epic views back down over the hut and the valley below it.

View behind the Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

The hills behind the Geldingafell Hut. I hiked up to where that little plateau juts out at the top left

And arrived back just in time for our al fresco dining for the evening – minestrone soup and spaghetti bolognaise 🙂  We all enjoyed sitting outside in the warm sunshine, but eventually had to retreat inside as the Sun approached the horizon and the temperature dropped.

Hiking companions sitting on the ground outside the Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

For dessert, Þorbjörg “went shopping” for us in the Icelandic Mountain Guides “store” out the back of the hut.  Because of the remoteness of this hut, the company estimates how many trekkers they will have during the summer and caches enough dry/tinned food during the winter (when they can access the hut by snowmobile) to cover their estimate.  The logistics for some of their treks are really impressive!

Icelandic Mountain Guides store at Geldingafell Hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

The “store”. A food cache set up by Icelandic Mountain Guides during the winter when they can access the hut by snow mobile

Sitting on our beds, we downed chocolate cake, Jägermeister (thanks to Wolfgang and Sabine – no Wolfgang – half a glass does not constitute “the smallest amount possible just for a taste”), and hot chocolate before most people turned in for the night.  I stayed up a little longer to catch a beautiful sunset at around 11:30pm, and then followed suit.

Sunset at hut - Shadow of Vatnajokull - East Iceland

Worth waiting up for!

Trekking Information

Distance = 11.39km

Time taken = 5 hours 07 minutes

Map

Basic Map of Day 1 of In the Shadow of Vatnajokull - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude profile of Day 1 of Shadow of Vatnajokull from Strava

Read more about hiking In the Shadow of Vatnajökull

If this post has piqued your curiosity, read about the rest of the 4-day trek “In the Shadow of Vatnajökull” with Icelandic Mountain Guides

Alternatively, check out my other posts about hiking and trekking in Iceland and around the world.

 

Like what you have read? Please follow and like me:
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Greenland – Sisimiut Sea Safari

I was on my third cup of tea over breakfast at the Hotel Sisimiut when Jan from Sisimiut Private Boat Safari called.  Yes, it was unbelievably foggy outside, but some of the calmest waters occur after a heavy fog lifts he told me – so could I be ready in 15 minutes?

Absolutely!

bacon, eggs and coffee for breakfast at the Hotel Sisimiut, West Greenland

I loved the breakfasts at the Hotel Sisimiut!

We’d been waiting a couple of days for the waters to be calm enough to set out on a “Sea Safari” around Sisimiut.  As the name suggests, the goal is to spot and observe the marine animals that are so plentiful in the fjords and off the coast of Greenland.  Seals and whales in particular are very common but, as with any safari, there are no guarantees…

Down at the harbour I once again donned the freezer suit that I’d worn on the trip to the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq the day before, and off we set.

Me in a freezer suit on the boat with Jan - Sisimiut - West Greenland

I was rugged up – nice and warm!

Heading out of Sisimiut you pass several small islands which are used by locals as “holiday islands” for their Greenlandic sled dogs.  The name stems from the fact that the dogs are free to roam the island as they please, a welcome change from being chained up all summer!

Pack of 5 Greenlandic Sled Dogs on and island off Sisimiut, West Greenland

Greenlandic Sled Dogs racing down the island to say “aluu” to us

It was stunningly beautiful out on the almost mirror-like water as we set about looking for wildlife.

Jan with binoculars scanning the ocean for wildlife from his boat - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Jan on the lookout for marine mammals

Though I was also captivated by the low fog that lay across the water, at times completely obscuring the horizon line.

Image of fog over water where it difficult to tell where one ends and the other begins - Sisimiut Sea Safari - West Greenland

Fog and water – where does one end and the other begin?

Unfortunately, despite the calm seas and our best efforts – there were simply no animals to be seen!  The chatter on the radio told us we weren’t the only ones having problems.  The local hunters were checking in with each other and reporting their unanimous bad luck in Greenlandic.  In almost 4 hours on the water, we managed to spot only a handful of individual seals that promptly disappeared as soon as we approached.

head of a seal poking out of the ocean - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Hello! One of the handful of lone seals we saw

That was it.

Well, apart from the sea birds that is 😊

The two main types of sea birds we saw on the safari out of Sisimiut, West Greenland

The two main types of sea birds we saw on the Sea Safari

Although this was disappointing, it is the nature of animal safaris the world over.  Sometimes you are unlucky when the animals don’t play the game!

We decided to abandon the search for animals for a while and Jan took me over to Nipisat Island – home to one of the most well-studied archaeological sites in this part of Greenland.  Extensively excavated between 1989 and 1994, the dig uncovered more than 70,000 bone fragments and 1,000 artefacts (including 314 tools) from the Saqqaq culture (~2500 – 1500BC).  If you are keen to learn more – you can read the full report by Anne Birgitte Gotfredsen and Tinna Møbjerg online 😊 

What remains now is a low, rectangular stone wall, partially covered in vegetation, that stands watch over the sea.

Two views of what remains of the Saqqaq Culture archaeological site on Nipisat Island near Sisimiut, West Greenland

Views of the archaeological remains left by the Saqqaq culture on Nipisat Island

After hiking up to the top of the island for an amazing view

Panorama from the top of Nipisat Island near Sisimiut in West Greenland

[move mouse over image to see the full panorama]

it was back in the boat for more tea

my gloved hand holding a cup of hot tea on the boat - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Hot tea was a very welcome part of our Sea Safari

while we made our way around to a beautiful white shell beach

 
View of the white shell beach near Sisimiut, West Greenland

The white shell beach was very isolated and hidden

and past the abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk, where Jan used to have a summer home.

Derelict buildings in the abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk near Sisimiut, West Greenland

The abandoned settlement of Uummannaarsuk

Unfortunately, we still had no luck with the animals on the way back to Sisimiut, though Jan never stopped searching!

Recommendation

One of the best ways to get close views of marine animals is on a sea safari in a small boat.  Unfortunately, I was very unlucky on this occasion (apparently there were seals everywhere 2 days later!) but it was still an amazing experience to be out on the water for an extended period of time. 

The freezer suit that Jan provides kept me warm for the whole 4 hours (and trust me, I feel the cold!) so you just have to make sure you have a good beanie, gloves and warm shoes to guarantee your comfort.

Cost:  Depends on the amount of time spent.  Have a look at the Sisimiut Private Boat Safari website for details.

Time: 4 hours

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

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Hiking Greenland – Abandoned Settlement of Assaqutaq

When you start researching things to do around Sisimiut you very quickly come across excursions to Assaqutaq – an abandoned settlement about 10km away.  The Hotel Sisimiut offers a boat tour to and from the settlement, but what I really wanted to do was take a boat out and then hike back.  I contacted Jan from Sisimiut Private Boat Safari to arrange and, with instructions to bring gloves and a beanie, was down at the harbour at the agreed meeting time.

The ramp down to where Jan's boat was docked in Sisimiut Harbour - West Greenland

The ramp down to where Jan’s boat was docked in Sisimiut Harbour

Jan’s boat is small – equipped to carry only 4 people at a time.  It is also open which means we were bundled up in freezer suits to combat the chill in the air (gloves and beanie not included). 

My friend and I in freezer suits ready for out boat outing - Sisimiut, West Greenland

All rugged up!

Jan, made of sturdier stuff, just wore a normal jacket and beanie!

My friend in a freezer suit sitting in front of Jan with just a normal jacket on - Sisimiut Boat Safari - West Greenland

Tyson in a freezer suit and Jan … not

As we made our way around to the entrance of the Amerloq fjord in which Assaqutaq is located, we had wonderful views of the colourful buildings of Sisimiut.  This, despite the very low cloud that didn’t look like it would be clearing off anytime soon 🙁

The colourful houses of Sisimiut as seen from the water - West Greenland

The colourful houses of Sisimiut as seen from the water

Jan kept a keen eye out for whales, seals and other wildlife as we motored along but, unfortunately on this day, the waters were very quiet.  We did see some fishermen with a lot of winged friends

Fisherman being swarmed by seagulls as he attempts to check his nets from his boat - near Sisimiut - West Greenland

and Jan made a brief stop at an historical site with the remains of round stone houses

stone ruins of old houses on the way to Assaqutaq

Ruins of old stone houses on the way to Assaqutaq

before arriving at Assaqutaq half an hour after setting out.

front of the boat with the buildings of Assaqutaq in front of us - Sisimiut - West Greenland

Arriving in Assaqutaq

The settlement is an interesting mix of derelict buildings and ones that have been refurbished to accommodate primarily school and scout groups.  Jan explained that hunters, fishermen and other people who follow more traditional Greenlandic practices are often brought in to teach the kids some of these skills and about their heritage – an awesome idea if ever there was one! 

As we tied up to the dock, we were greeted by 5 kids on a school camp.  While 4 of them endeavoured to manipulate a canoe and catch fish (no supervision at all, they had to figure it all out for themselves), the 5th one started peppering us with questions in very good English!  “I’m feeling lazy”, he sighed when we asked him why he wasn’t in the canoe.  And his response when we asked him where he learned his English: “YouTube”!

School kids fishing and maneuvering a canoe in Assaqutaq near Sisimiut, West Greenland

Being a native English speaker, I’ve often lamented that it is much easier for a motivated person to learn English from anywhere in the world than to learn any another language – simply because English is so ubiquitous and so dominant in popular culture.  Certainly, many of the people I’ve met who have learned English have cited YouTube or TV or Hollywood movies as one of their key reference sources.  The other: having the opportunity to talk to English-speaking tourists they encounter – something that is very much put into practice in Uzbekistan.  And while I acknowledge that most languages have a web presence these days, try teaching yourself Greenlandic via YouTube … it is not so easy to find material, nor is it easy to find a Greenlander outside of Greenland and Denmark (yes, I’ve started learning a little Greenlandic – thanks Memrise)!

After hot tea and biscuits at the dock, Tyson and I set off to explore the crumbling structures of Assaqutaq. 

My friend looking in the window of one of the derelict buildings at Assaqutaq near Sisimiut, West Greenland

It was absolutely beautiful! 

The faded paint that is slowly being stripped off the walls by the harsh Greenlandic weather,

Several photos of the faded exterior of derelict houses in Assaqutaq near Sisimiut, West Greenland

the almost empty, half-collapsed but still brightly painted interiors,

Several images of the interiors of the abandoned houses in Assaqutaq near Sisimiut, West Greenland

the overgrown cemetery,

Wooden crosses and paling fences around the graves at Assaqutaq cemetery near Sisimiut - West Greenland

Assaqutaq cemetery

and the complete silence

Panorama over Assaqutaq from one of the highest points on the island - Sisimiut - West Greenland

[move mouse over image to see the full panorama]

made for a fascinating, if slightly eerie exploration of this settlement that was abandoned in 1968.  In fact, Jan’s wife was the second-last child born in the settlement – her family home now slowly falling into ruin.

Derelict porch of a house in Assaqutaq near Sisimiut - West Greenland

The derelict remnants of the house that Jan’s wife grew up in.

We poked our heads into the refurbished building the school group was occupying, walked through the old fish processing plant, and checked out the church as well (you can get married here if you wish!)

Images of the exterior and interior of the refurbished church at Assaqutaq near Sisimiut, West Greenland

before Jan pointed us in the direction of where to start the hike and gave us some instructions on how to find the trail.

Assaqutaq is actually located on an island, separated from the mainland by a narrow stretch of water.  There is now a bridge spanning the gap, and it is one of the coolest bridges I’ve ever crossed!

My friend making his way across the footbridge with Assaqutaq in the background, near Sisimiut, West Greenland

Tyson braving the footbridge

It is made of wooden planks tied together and to the bridge supports by rope, but there appears to be some missing and the experience of crossing this bridge can be described as “unstable” at best.  It was so much fun – we did it twice!

detail of the wooden planks and ropes tying the footbridge from Assaqutaq to the mainland together - near Sisimiut, West Greenland

The wooden planks of the footbridge are tied together with rope

The next obstacle was a scramble up an almost vertical cliff

My friend climbing the almost vertical slope to get to the trail - Assaqutaq, West Greenland

and then some bush-bashing until we finally stumbled upon the foot-width trail heading towards Sisimiut.  The views back over Assaqutaq were stunning!

View from on high back down over the abandoned settlement of Assaqutaq - near Sisimiut, West Greenland

View of Assaqutaq from the trail

and the trail, once found, was pretty obvious through to unmissable – especially once the red-or-blue-paint-on-rocks trail markers began.  I later found out that the trail markers had just been renewed the previous weekend.

Images of the trail leading from Assaqutaq to Sisimiut, West Greenland

The trail and its red markers (painted on the rocks) were usually very visible.

After about a kilometre, we came across a grave that was the most obvious visible sign of the old whaler’s station of Qerrortusoq,

Old grave at the site of Qerrortusoq - on the trail from Assaqutaq to Sisimiut, West Greenland

and a little further along, a group of students and teachers from Arctic DTU camped by the trail.  They invited us to have tea and explained how in their program (which is focused on construction engineering in Arctic environments), the Danish and Greenlandic students spend their first 3 semesters in Sisimiut, and then finish their studies in Denmark.  We had come across the group during the very first activity at the start of their commencing semester, where they get to know each other by spending 3 days camping near Sisimiut working on a project together. 

The awesome footbridge we’d just crossed was a project from 2 years ago (apparently the wooden planks were originally evenly spaced, but the knots holding everything in place had moved), and for the past two years, students have been working on building a small cabin for their own use when they need a break from study.  They were more than enthusiastic to show us around and explain what they were doing and, after waiting a couple of minutes for the finishing touches to go on, I even got to be the first person to walk up the newly constructed stairs to the hut 😊

Images of the hut being fitted out by the students of DTU

The hut being built by the students from DTU. I love the use of the shape of Greenland to secure the large windows (middle), and in the bottom left image we are learning about the special stove they are installing which also provides hot water.

We spent quite a while chatting about the unique features of the hut and how to construct a cabin that is completely isolated from everything, before wishing them well in their studies and heading further along the trail.

Despite the less-than-spectacular weather, with the fjord on one side and the mountains (their tops admittedly lost in cloud) on the other, it was a really stunning hike.  We stopped to enjoy the mist and light playing out over the fjord

Light playing on the fog and fjord between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut, West Greenland

I love abstract scenes!

while keeping a wary eye on how low the cloud was reaching on the mountains.  Although the trail was well marked, we didn’t want to be walking in fog.

My friend hiking towards a mountain obscured in the fog between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut - West Greenland

Keeping a wary eye…

In fact, the only time we temporarily “lost” the trail was when it descended into a mini-forest of Dwarf Arctic Birch that had managed to grow as tall as Tyson!  It is amazing what can happen with abundant water and a sheltered position.

My friend almost completely covered by the dwarf Arctic Birch forest between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut - West Greenland

For reference, Tyson is around 2m tall

Yes, there are boulder fields to negotiate, and rocks to scramble over and climb, but the hike between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut is not overly technical and these kinds of obstacles just make it even more fun and interesting 😊

Images of some of the trickier parts of the trail between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut, West Greenland

There were quite a few rocky obstacles to overcome between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut

We were almost all the way back to Sisimiut when the cloud started to lift and the sun finally put in an appearance.

Images of the final parts of the trail between Assaqutaq and Sisimiut - once the sun had come out. West Greenland

Blue skies!

When this happened, the whole feeling of the hike was transformed from one of mystery to one of joy and I look forward to returning one day to hike the whole thing under blue skies. 

I’m super-keen to see what those mountains look like from the trail!

Recommendation

If you like hiking, I highly recommend taking a boat transfer from Sisimiut to Assaqutaq and then walking back to town.  It is stunning to experience the area from both the sea and the land, and the trail is only moderately difficult with quite a few boulder scrambles and small rock climbs.

Cost: Have a look at the Sisimiut Boat Safari website for details.

Time:

  • Boat transfer: ~1/2 hour (though it depends on how much wildlife is around)
  • Assaqutaq: as long as you like. We spent about an hour here but could easily have spent longer
  • Hike back to Sisimiut: 3-4 hours

Hiking Information

Distance = 9.8km

Time taken = 4 hours 30 minutes (includes stopping and chatting with DTI students for almost an hour)

Map

Basic Map the hike from Assaqutaq to Sisimiut - from Movescount

Altitude Profile

Basic altitude profile of the hike from Assaqutaq to Sisimiut - from Strava

Download trail as .gpx or .kml

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

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Reykjavik Food Lovers Tour – Icelandic Traditional Food

After 2 years of this blog, my friends joke that if I’m not posting about hikes or treks I’ve done, I’m posting about food.  So they won’t be surprised that one of the very first things I did when planning my trip to Iceland was look up foodie tours 🙂  Specifically, I was looking for an opportunity to try some of the more unusual Icelandic foods, which is how I chose the Reykjavik Food Lovers Tour – Icelandic Traditional Food by Your Friend in Reykjavik.

We were met at Ingolfstorg Square by our guide, Fanney, and walked less than a block to our first foodie stop.  No, I’m not going to tell you where – you need to actually do the tour to find out 😉  Suffice to say that the restaurant is one of the older houses in Iceland and was originally used for falconry!

Heading out to the first stop on the foodie tour

Heading out to our first stop on the foodie tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik

Foodie tour stop 1: Puffin

Here we tried one of the things I was most excited about – hot smoked Icelandic puffin.  Yes, those cute little birds with the bright orange beaks. 

Hot smoked Icelandic puffin - traditional food

Hot smoked Icelandic puffin

I was surprised at the very “smooth” texture of the meat, and both the presentation of the dish and the interior of the restaurant were amazing!  This was one of my favourite dishes on the tour, eaten under very different conditions to almost every other foodie tour I’ve done where I’m usually just standing around in the middle of a market or out on the street 🙂

Eating hot smoked Icelandic Puffin in restaurant in Reykjavik

Tasting hot smoked Icelandic Puffin in Reykjavik

While we were eating, Fanney explained that although puffins spend most of their lives at sea, during the spring and summer months an estimated 10 million of them come to Iceland to nest.  She also explained how the hunting of puffins is regulated in Iceland and just how difficult it is to actually catch them!  Watch Gordan Ramsay try 🙂

Foodie Tour stop 2: Icelandic Lamb Soup

Our next stop was again only a block or so away at one of the oldest restaurants in Reykjavik (founded in 1932).  Here we tucked into a too-large-for-a-foodie-tour bowl of Icelandic lamb soup with its melt-in-the-mouth lamb, tender carrots, celery, potatoes, onions and loads of rich lamb flavour.  Although I’m a seasoned foodie tour goer and I knew I should be pacing myself – I couldn’t help but finish the whole bowl … and the bread.

Icelandic Lamb Soup - Reykjavik foodie tour - Your Friend in Reykjavik

Icelandic Lamb Soup

To make this soup there are special cuts of lamb that should be used as well as a very particular herb mix, but as far as veggies go – well anything that doesn’t go bad too quickly is fair game.

Two tastings in and so many more to go…  Oh oh – already starting to feel full!  Fortunately our next couple of stops involved much smaller samples!

Foodie Tour stop 3: Icelandic Hot Dogs

Icelandic hotdogs are basically an unofficial national dish.  Made predominantly out of lamb (theoretically) you should ask for “one with the lot” to enjoy the full experience of fried and raw onion, ketchup, remoulade, and sweet brown mustard (pylsusinnep) along with the dog and steamed bun.

Icelandic hot dog on Traditional food tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik

Icelandic hot dog from Reykjavik’s best (and oldest) hotdog stand. Yes – they even have hot dog holders on the tables!

The hotdog stand we visited on the foodie tour has been around since 1937 and shot to fame in 2004 when Bill Clinton ate there.  I’m nowhere near famous, and I don’t usually eat hotdogs, but I have to admit this these ones make for a very tasty snack!

Foodie Tour stop 4: Dried Fish

You don’t have to be in Iceland long to realise that dried fish (Harðfiskur) is also a staple in the Icelandic diet and a favourite snack for locals.  I had eaten a lot of Icelandic dried fish on the Unplugged Wilderness Trek in East Greenland last year and love pairing it with remoulade (mayonnaise is one of the very few things I really don’t like the taste of, but for some reason, I love remoulade!).  Every Icelander I’ve suggested this to, including Fanney, has looked at me in bewilderment and admitted they’d never thought to try that.  They usually just eat it plain or team it up with butter!  Seriously guys – try it.  It is amazing!

Eating dried fish (haddock) at Reykjavik harbour on the Food lovers tour by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Trying dried haddock at Reykjavik harbour

After enjoying the brisk evening air down by the harbour, it was time to head back inside for two more of the new tastes I’d been looking forward to.  As an added bonus, one of the wonderful things about the restaurants chosen for this tour is that each of them seems to have an historical story or anecdote that makes them special.  Fanney related yet another of these stories to us as we headed towards our next dining experience – but you’ll have to do the tour in order to find out why this guy is special and occupies a very important position in the restaurant we entered next 🙂

Previous owner

Foodie Tour stop 5: Fermented Shark, Lobster Soup and Minke Whale

If you mention traditional Icelandic food, those who know something about it will come back with “don’t they eat fermented shark?”  Why, yes they do!  Or rather, they did (current Icelanders are far more likely to opt for a hot dog) and this is what we were going to try next.

Given that Hákarl is an “acquired taste” we were presented with small cubes to sample.  I’d actually tried some previously with the Icelandic family with who I was staying, but this time around the ammonia was much stronger (to me it had elements of a REALLY strong brie).  I don’t find the taste horrible, in fact I was surprised at how mild it was, but I also wouldn’t rush to order it I have to admit.

Cubes of fermented shark on the Traditional Icelandic Foods tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik

Cubes of fermented shark

We actually had 3 plates in this restaurant (!) and next up was lobster (langostine) soup – one of the most popular dishes on the menu.  This was really creamy with a slight thai-red-curry flavour and very tasty.  

Lobster soup as part of the Traditional Icelandic Food Tour by Your Friend in Reykjavik

However, by far my favourite dish of the whole tour was the third dish we tried – Minke whale with honey mustard dressing.  I’d tried whale previously in Greenland and liked it – but this was beyond awesome!  Tender, juicy, and with a perfect balance of spices.  Oh. My. Goodness.  

Minke Whale steak on the Traditional Food lovers tour by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Minke Whale with honey mustard dressing

I know some people won’t even entertain the thought of eating whale based on what we hear about whale hunting in the media (actually I’d be surprised if such people were still reading given I opened with eating puffin…), but Minke whales have never been endangered and there is a yearly quota (of less than 0.03% of the stocks around Iceland) that is strictly adhered to.  In other words, it is sustainably hunted (as it is in Greenland) and is more “green” than importing beef or chicken from other countries.

Foodie Tour stop 6: Special Fish and Chips

As you can imagine, by this time we were all quite stuffed with food (though I could have squeezed in a couple more serves of whale).  But we weren’t done yet as we waddled a few more blocks into a restaurant famous for its fish bites served with 9 different sauces.  Somehow I was going to have to make room…

Fish and chips with 9 different sauces

3 different types of fish. Awesome chips. 9 different flavours of sauce. What combination to choose?!

The fish on offer depends on what has been caught fresh that day – in our case: Ling, Cod and Tusk – and is cooked in a special batter that is very light and more like a Japanese tempura.  The sauces are all based on Skyr (a high protein yoghurt-like dairy product that is very traditional to Iceland) and the sauces we were presented with were: mango, honey mustard, coriander, tzatiki, chilli, lemon & dill, basil, tartare, and truffle & tarragon.  Unfortunately I couldn’t keep straight which one was which (they weren’t labelled) but my tastebuds surprised me by indicating that mango was my favourite (I wouldn’t have thought to pair it with fish and chips) followed by honey mustard, then coriander.  It turns out almost everybody’s favourite is the mango 🙂

Foodie Tour stop 7: Skyr Dessert

Beyond stuffed, we still had one last dish to sample on this incredible foodie tour.  Fortunately it was dessert, and everybody knows there is a whole separate stomach for dessert … right?

We actually ended up back at the very first restaurant we started at for our Skyr dessert and an Icelandic beer.

Skyr Dessert to top off the incredible Food Lovers Tour by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Skyr, cream cheese, biscotti, pistachio and berry jam “Skyr Dessert”. Heaven on a plate!

Tasting similar to a cheesecake, this was another of my favourites for the tour.  And having eaten mine quicker than the others, I was looking longingly over for scraps … none of which were forthcoming.  It was too good!  And a perfect way to finish off our trip through modern and more traditional Icelandic fare.

Fanney left us each with a chocolate bar that incorporated Icelandic liquorice (oh how I love Icelandic liquorice!) and I eventually managed to bid my fellow foodies adieu and stagger back home with my over-extended but very happy stomach.

Recommendation

I absolutely recommend the Reykjavik Food Lovers Tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik.  The food is amazing (and very plentiful!), the stories about the establishments are really interesting, and Fanney had loads of information about Icelandic food preparation and food culture in general.

There is not a lot of walking involved – everything is contained within a few blocks of the centre of Reykjavik.  If anything – a little more walking between courses would have been beneficial 🙂

Top Tip:  perhaps don’t eat breakfast or lunch beforehand!

CostISK 14,990  (USD$125)

Time: about 3 hours

 

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Hiking Greenland – Russell Glacier

It was quite difficult to tell how many days I should allocate to exploring the area around Kangerlussuaq before starting the Arctic Circle Trail trek.  There seemed to be a fair few options for things to do – the Russell Glacier, visiting the Greenland Ice Sheet at Point 660, Sugarloaf Mountain, Garnet Rock, a wildlife safari – and in the end, I decided on 2 days at the beginning and 2 days at the end.  Unfortunately, this was curtailed to 1 day at the beginning (thanks to Air Iceland Connect dropping their direct Reykjavik-Kangerlussuaq route) and no days at the end (thanks to being stranded in Sisimiut due to bad weather) – so the only activity I managed was a trip out to Russell Glacier with Kang Mini Tours.

Our guide, Tommy, arrived at Old Camp to pick me up at the agreed time, and off we headed up the gravel road.  Running approximately 53km from Kellyville to the Icesheet, it is the longest road in Greenland and accounts for around 1/3 of the road infrastructure (outside of the settlements) in the country! 

Our 4x4 jeep on the road to the Russell Glacier

It was originally constructed to give access to the icesheet so that Volkswagon could test their cars under extreme cold and almost zero traction conditions.  However, this activity no longer takes place and it now provides inexpensive access for scientists studying the ice as well as for tourists wanting to visit the world’s second largest icefield and the Russell Glacier.

As we followed the meandering Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua river (more commonly known by its Danish name: Sandflugtdalen), Tommy told us some of the history of Kangerlussuaq, kept a keen eye out of wildlife – particularly Musk Oxen – and also explained a little about the geology and botany of the area.  

Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (Sandflugtdalen in Danish) is the river that flows from the base of the Russell Glacier to the Kangerlussuaq Fjord

Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (Sandflugtdalen in Danish) is the impressive river that you follow all the way from Kangerlussuaq to the Russell Glacier

Our jeep ride ended just past the locked boom-gate at the end of Aajuitsup Tasia lake, and we followed a trail up and over the ridge

Aajuitsup Tasia lake as seen from the trail ascending the hill in front of the Russell Glacier, Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

Looking back down the trail to Aajuitsup Tasia lake

for our first view down onto the Russell Glacier itself.

Looking down on the Russell Glacier from the ridge - Kangerlussuaq - West Greenland

Looking down on the Russell Glacier from the ridge

Words cannot describe the shear magnificence of glaciers, and even though I’ve seen a lot of them in my travels both here in Greenland and also in Patagonia, I never tire of their intricate beauty.

different views of the ice making up the Russell Glacier near Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland

Ice details. I am fascinated by ice, so glaciers are a constant source of wonder for me

One of the incredible things about the Russell Glacier is just how close you can get to its 60m-high face. 

Me standing on rocks looking across the river at the 60m high face of the Russell Glacier

Looking up at the 60m high face of the Russell Glacier

And although you should never approach too closely (you never know when the glacier may calve and send ice falling to either crush you or cause a wave that will sweep you off your feet), there are places where you can literally reach out and touch it.

One such place was right near this waterfall spilling into an ice cave under the glacier.  Just a little further around, the glacier was still directly grinding on the surrounding rocks, buffing them with the smooth sheen that is so typical of Greenlandic geology.

Waterfall and Ice cave at the base of the Russell Glacier near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

Amazing waterfall flowing into an ice cave at the bottom of the glacier

Speaking of which. I’m thinking of creating a coffee-table book of the patterns of Greenlandic rocks.  What do you think of the idea?

views of patterns in the rocks surrounding the Russell Glacier near Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland

Greenland has some of the most beautiful and interesting rocks I’ve ever seen. I absolutely love the “rock art” here

I ended up spending the entire day out at the Russell Glacier, even though the tour was only meant to be ~3 hours long.  When I returned to the jeep at the allocated time and complained that 1.5hrs wasn’t nearly enough time to explore the area, Tommy said that he had to return later in the day to drop off supplies to some locals and that he could pick me up then if I wanted.  Absolutely!

It was an incredible day spent enjoying the peace and solitude of this remarkable site

The purple Niviarsiaq - Greenland's national flower - growing between the rocks in front of the Russell Glacier near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

Niviarsiaq – Greenland’s national flower – is amazingly hardy and can seemingly grow anywhere!

and it struck me that this is what the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina must have been like at some point.   While Russell Glacier is nowhere near as big as Perito Moreno, it is still a spectacular glacier – made all the more so by the lack of infrastructure and the thousands of tourists.  

Panorama of the Russell Glacier near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

[Click and drag to see full panorama]

In fact, I pretty much had the place to myself!  I only saw 3 other people during the entire day – it seems everybody heads out to Point 660 instead!  

Three visitors hiking to the main viewpoint over the Russell Glacier with the sheer wall of the glacier in front of them. Near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

The only other people I saw for the entire day I was at the Russell Glacier. Here they are hiking to the main viewpoint over the glacier. I love the scale depicted in this image.

Tommy returned to collect me at the end of the day and we stopped off briefly to explore an old plane that crashed back in the 1960s.

remains of a plane that crashed near Kangerlussuaq in the 1960s - along the road to Russell Glacier

And although we kept a keen eye out for wildlife, the best we saw were a few Musk Oxen down in the river valley, a very long way from where we were driving.  Oh well, perhaps I’ll get luckier as I hike the Arctic Circle Trail.

Recommendation

A visit to Russell Glacier is a highlight of any stay in Kangerlussuaq.  Unfortunately I can’t compare it to Point 660, but I loved the solitude of the glacier and the fact I was pretty much the only one there on this occasion.  This certainly wouldn’t have been the case at Point 660 judging by the number of buses I saw heading out there.

The trip with Kang Mini Tours is comfortable and informative and Tommy was happy to stop for photos as often as we wanted.  For most people, 1.5 hours at the glacier would probably be enough, though keep in mind that around half that time is spent walking to the main viewpoint and back.  The hike is not difficult, but it does take some time.

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Icelandic Mythical Walk – Reykjavik Folklore tour

I’ve always loved stories and am an avid reader of fantasy novels.  So of course the Icelandic Mythical Walk with its focus on Icelandic folk tales, piqued my interest – particularly after hearing about Icelandic trolls during the In the Shadow of Vatnajökull trek, and the Hidden Folk (aka Elves) on the Laugavegur & Fimmvörðuháls trek with Icelandic Mountain Guides.

I met the rest of the group at the basalt pillars in Ingolfstorg square in the centre of Reykjavik where Stefan, our guide from Your Friend in Reykjavik, kicked off our adventure into storyland by explaining just how and why folk tales are so important in Icelandic culture.  You have to do something to keep yourself entertained during the long, cold winter nights right?!

Stefan introducing the Icelandic Mythical Walk at the basalt pillars in Ingolfstorg Square - Reykjavik

Stefan introducing the Icelandic Mythical Walk at the basalt pillars in Ingolfstorg Square

From the site of the first church and oldest tree (150 years) in Iceland

Stefan telling stories at the site of the first church in Iceland on the Icelandic Mythical walk by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Learning about how to raise the dead on the site of the first church in Iceland

to the beautiful park surrounding Landakotskirkja (the Catholic cathedral in Reykjavik)

Stefan telling stories in the park near Landakotskirkja on the Icelandic Mythical walk by Your Friend in Reykjavik

to the statue of Úr Álögum (The Breaking of the Spell) by Einar Jónsson on the shore of Tjörnin Lake

Stefan telling stories near the Úr Álögum statue on the Icelandic Mythical walk by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Stefan kept us enthralled and laughing our heads off with tales of how to raise the dead (it is apparently a long process involving a rolling pin!), to how to acquire a pair of necro-pants (because this is something we all should know), to the 13 Santa Clauses of Iceland (no, they are not as jolly as the one most of us have in our own countries), to how the “hidden people”, or Elves, became invisible to humans.

An animated Stefan in mid-story

Stefan was such a great storyteller!

For example, our tour led us past this rock in one of the oldest suburbs of Reykjavik near the centre of downtown.  It is actually an Elf home!

An Elf rock near the centre of downtown Reykjavik

An Elf rock near the centre of downtown Reykjavik

Stefan explained that as Reykjavik expanded, the city tried everything to move this rock but nothing worked (the marks are scars from the different techniques they tried to move it).  So they brought in an expert – an Elf negotiator – who had a chat with the Elves asking whether their rock could be relocated.  The Elves agreed but asked for a week to prepare.  When the construction workers returned a week later – the rock was easily moved to its current location! 

Stefan explaining about Elf rocks on the Icelandic Mythical Folklore Tour by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Stefan explaining about Elf rocks like the one we’d just seen the public park behind us

Apparently most Icelanders don’t deny the existence of Elves and it is quite a common occurrence that if someone wants to move a large rock like this, people will get sick, machinery will break down, etc., to the point where Icelanders just know not to mess with it!  If you don’t believe me – do a quick Google search and see how many articles you find about road construction (in particular) being thwarted by these “hidden people”.

Of course, no folklore tour would be complete without a stop in a cemetery, and this was no exception.  We spent quite a bit of time walking the narrow paths guarded by massive trees in the beautiful Hólavallagarður cemetery just outside of downtown Reykjavik listening to Stefan’s spooky stories!

Stefan scaring us with more Icelandic stories in Hólavallagarður cemetery in Reykjavik on the Icelandic Mythical Folklore Walk by Your Friend in Reykjavik

Stefan scaring us with more Icelandic stories in Hólavallagarður cemetery in Reykjavik

Obviously you need to do the tour to hear the stories and dip your toe into the rich folklore of Iceland that has inspired storytelling around the world (most notably, Tolkien).  I’m certainly not going to spoil all the fun here! 

Million thanks to Stefan my fellow folklore aficionados for a really great evening!

Our Icelandic Mythical Walk group having fun with the group photo

Great fun bunch of people

Recommendation

The Icelandic Mythical Walk with Your Friend in Reykjavik is a really fun way to spend an evening in Reykjavik and immerse yourself in one of the key aspects of Icelandic culture.  Stefan is a great storyteller and we had loads of laughs!

Cost: 3,900ISK (~USD$33)

Time: ~3 hours

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The eternal twilight of Greenland

Greenland during the summer is embraced by an eternal twilight.

Read more about this amazing phenomenon in my latest blog post at Guide to Greenland: “Northern Lights in Greenland – the Midnight Sun“. 

2am sunrise in East Greenland

A 2am sunrise in East Greenland

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Offline for a while…

Hi all –

Just a quick note to let you know I’m disappearing for a bit…

Where am I off to?   Well, I start here (no surprises 🙂 )

Then head to Nepal for 2.5 months of hiking, and Kenya for a month before returning home to Australia for Christmas.

I will catch up eventually (certainly by the end of the year)… and there will be a large number of blog posts… but not until I stop walking!

Stick with me!

Like my Facebook page to know when the next posts come out.   

And/or follow me on Instagram for some sneak-peeks along the way.

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The Abandoned Bluie East Two Airfield in East Greenland

On Day 5 of the 12-day Unplugged Wilderness Trek with Greenland Adventures by Icelandic Mountain Guides, I visited an abandoned WWII airfield code-named Bluie East Two.   

Rusted bits and pieces litter the ground at the abandoned Bluie East Two WWII airstrip

Rusted bits and pieces litter the ground at the abandoned Bluie East Two WWII airstrip

Read more about the history of the site, its current state and its future in my latest blog post at Guide to Greenland: Exploring Bluie East Two – an Abandoned WWII Air Base in East Greenland

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences and adventures here on my blog.  There are 14 posts in total for the Unplugged Wilderness Trek – best to start with Day 1 🙂

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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