Hiking Greenland – Icefjords and Remote Villages – Tiniteqilaaq

Despite being thwarted last night in watching the Sun set behind the Greenland Icesheet at 11:30pm, ever the optimist, I got myself out of bed at 2:00am to go take photos as the Sun rose again (nights are very short during Greenlandic summers!)

Sunrise over the Sermilik Fjord near Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
Sunrise at 2am over a very foggy Sermilik Fjord

Although the fog was still lingering, I decided to set up my camera for time-lapse photography and leave it running while I went back to bed.  The result: the following (slightly imperfect) video revealing how the hidden currents in the fjord move the icebergs in different directions (I’ve slowed it down so you can see the movement clearly).

Slowed to 1/4 speed

The schedule for today had us hiking in the hills behind the hut at Tiniteqilaaq – an excursion that Andrea assured us would reveal views as spectacular as the one from the front porch … if only we could drag ourselves away.

Looking out over the icebergs in the Sermilik Fjord near Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
You can never get tired of this view

It was a bit of a “choose your own adventure” as Andrea led us along the Sermilik Fjord

Hiking along the Sermilik Fjord near Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland

around semi-frozen lakes

semi-frozen lakes on our day hike out of Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland

and searched for the best way up the mountain, given the numerous snowfields.

views of our hiking route on the day hike out of Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
Views along our hiking route

We had incredible views over the Ikaasatsivaq Fjord

Panorama of the Ikaasatsivaq Fjord near Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland

[move mouse over image to view whole panorama]

and the Sermilik Fjord, and of the intricate, almost organic patterns in the Greenlandic rocks (those who have read my other posts from Greenland will know how obsessed I am by the rocks here).

patterns in the rock look almost organic - East Greenland
The patterns in the rocks look almost organic – like trees

Given the amount of snow we were hiking through (waaaaay more than is normal at this time of year), we didn’t actually make it all the way to the point that Andrea was aiming for.  Rather, she called a halt on a ridge that had an incredible dual-view.  On one side – a frozen lake in front of the Innertivik and Ikaasatsivaq Fjords,

Panorama of view over Innertivik and Ikaasatsivaq Fjords near Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland

[move mouse over image to view whole panorama]

and on the other – the Sermilik Fjord.

me taking in the view over the Sermilik Fjord near Tinit - East Greenland
Love this view!

We stopped here for over an hour having lunch and enjoying the perfect day with some of the world’s most spectacular views.

Our guide relaxing at our lunch spot on our hike from Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
Andrea enjoying the sunshine and the views

Eventually, Andrea encouraged us to our feet for the return journey back to the hut.  We initially took a slightly different route which led us past the most incredible snow-pool – an oval of bright blue water surrounded by pristine snow.  Despite hating cold water, the pool was so perfect that I had the overwhelming urge to go in!

Perfect snow pool on our day hike from Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
This looked so perfect!

The whole hike delivered on Andrea’s promise of spectacular views

Admiring the views on our day hike out of Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland

and it was interesting to see what new icebergs had made their way to the front “doorstep” of our hut while we’d been gone.

Large icebergs in front of our hut at Tiniteqilaaq - East Greenland
New icebergs in front of our hut

I absolutely loved the shape of this large iceberg, so grabbed my camera and tripod for a little more time-lapse photography 😊

Slowed to 1/4 speed

The wonderful thing about time-lapse is how it reveals the extent to which things move, especially when that movement is barely perceptible in real time.  For example, I thought that the large iceberg had rotated while I sat there for the hour, but I wasn’t sure.  The time-lapse shows just how much it turned before setting off up the fjord, as well as which bergs were stuck fast, grounded on the bottom.

Read more about the Icefjords and Remote Villages Tour

If this post has piqued your curiosity about hiking and trekking in East Greenland, read about the rest of my adventure on the 10-day Icefjords and Remote Villages tour with Greenland Adventures:

If it has sparked an interest in Greenland more generally, learn more about this amazing country at Visit Greenland, and check out the wide range of tours of all kinds (not just hiking and trekking) at Guide to Greenland.

Hiking Information

Distance = 8.2km

Time taken = 7 hours

Strava Link = https://www.strava.com/activities/1704297064

Map

Basic Map of hike near Tiniteqilaaq on Day 7 of Icefjords and Remote Villages Trek - from Strava

Altitude Profile

Altitude profile of hike near Tiniteqilaaq on Day 7 of Icefjords and Remote Villages Trek - from Strava
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