Tag Archives: Greenland

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Helicopter Summit Flight – Sermitsiaq – Nuuk

Sitting in a helicopter flying towards the iconic Sermitsiaq Mountain at sunset is by far one of the most amazing things you can do in Nuuk. The only thing that could make it better – actually land near the summit and have time to explore!

An interesting fact about Greenland is that flying in a helicopter is a relatively common way of getting around. Greenland has no roads between its towns, which means that the only year-round option to get from place to place is by air (you can’t sail in winter).

Although helicopters provide a vital cog in the transportation infrastructure for Greenland, it is also possible to take some tourism-oriented flights. The main options are in Ilulissat, Kangerlussuaq, Qaqortoq and Nuuk – with the Helicopter Summit Flight being the pinnacle in Greenland’s capital city.

Safety briefing

My 4 fellow passengers and I met our pilot at Nuuk’s small airport at 5pm. Geir led us out to the helicopter, gave us a safety briefing and asked who wanted the front seat. While everyone else was being nice and pausing before putting their hand up – I just jumped right in 🙂

pilot giving safety briefing before we board the helicopter for the Nuuk Summit flight to Sermitsiaq - West Greenland
Geir pointing out all the important bits

With the others squeezed into the back of the helicopter (there’s not much space when you get 4 adults in there) and our headsets on, we took off in the direction of Sermitsiaq.

Taking off in the helicopter for the Nuuk Summit Flight. The runway at Nuuk airport and Sermitsiaq - West Greenland
Taking off towards Sermitsiaq

Flying around Sermitisaq

It is a short flight from Nuuk to Sermitsiaq mountain – but absolutely stunning!

Aerial view as we approach Sermitisiaq on the helicopter summit flight from Nuuk - West Greenland
Love the different perspective on this mountain when seen from the air

On a day like this – the views go on forever – and you really can appreciate the spectacular beauty of the Nuuk Fjord.

Looking beyond Sermitsiaq's peak further into the Nuuk Fjord - West Greenland
Looking over the top of the peak of Sermitsiaq further into the Nuuk Fjord
Other peaks in the Nuuk Fjord that are very close to the city - West Greenland
The Nuuk Fjord is stunningly beautiful. This is the doorstop of Greenland’s capital city

I had actually done this helicopter summit flight earlier in the year during Winter.  Back then, the entire mountain was covered in snow and you couldn’t see any of the details. Those of you who have been following for a while know how much I am in love with rocks in Greenland – and being able to see the rock coming through the dusting of snow on the peak was a highlight for me.

Rock detail of sermitisiaq mountain - Nuuk - West Greenland

As was discovering unexpectedly that there is a large lake between the ridge and the summit!  I had absolutely no idea that was there as it was completely covered in snow and ice the last time I visited.

Hidden lake between the ridge and the peak of Sermitsiaq mountain - Nuuk - West Greenland
I had no idea this was here!

To ensure that everyone ended up with a fantastic view of the mountain, Geir took us on 2 circuits of the summit – first one direction and then the other. Both the amazing views and the slightly disorienting feeling of manoeuvring in a circle in a helicopter brought a massive smile to my face.

Summit landing on Sermitsiaq

After we’d all taken about a million photos of the mountain, Geir bought us in to land on the ridge below the peak of Sermitsiaq.

Really – it doesn’t get any better than this!

helicopter and people on the ridge in front of the summit of Sermitsiaq - Nuuk - West Greenland
Our landing spot. You can see the actual summit of Sermitsiaq in the background

There was not a breath of wind (the wind was coming from directly behind the peak so we were sheltered) and we had the next 25 minutes to explore our incredible surroundings and try to take in where we were and what we were experiencing.

Contemplating the experience on top of Sermitsiaq - Nuuk - West Greenland
Contemplating the experience

I couldn’t get over the existence of the hidden lake! And the fact that there was an almost perfect reflection of the golden peak in its waters was just the icing on the cake.

panorama from the landing site on Sermitsiaq including the hidden lake - West Greenland - Nuuk

move mouse over image to see full panorama

The light was spectacular, and becoming more so by the minute as the sun headed towards the horizon. 

Glimpse of Nuuk Fjord and mountains- West Greenland
The Nuuk Fjord is amazing

It didn’t matter which direction I looked – the view in front of me was one of the most beautiful I’d ever seen.

sun setting behind the helicopter on the summit flight - nuuk - West Greenland
Sun setting behind the helicopter – Nuuk is down below

Yes – I know there are a lot of superlatives in this post – but it really was beyond incredible!

me standing on Sermitsiaq mountain with the Nuuk fjord behind - West Greenland
So happy!

Flight back to Nuuk

I used every second of my 25 minutes exploring the ridge and taking photos in all directions. But eventually we had to leave.  This time I sat in the back of the helicopter – which still offers awesome views as you fly.

looking out the front window between the pilot and passenger on Nuuk helicopter summit flight - West Greenland
Even from the middle-back seat the views are amazing
pastel light view looking out the side window of the helicopter summit flight - Nuuk - West Greenland
Looking out the side window

Our return flight took us past the airport

view of airport and store malene from helicopter summit flight - Nuuk - West Greenland
Nuuk airport with Store Malene in the background

and over the city of Nuuk itself

Passenger taking photo as we circle over Nuuk center on helicopter summit flight - West Greenland

before circling around

view of private harbour, airport and sermitsiaq from helicopter - Nuuk - West Greenland

to land back at Nuuk airport.

Nuuk airport terminal from the tarmac - West Greenland
Nuuk airport terminal

A must-do helicopter scenic flight

If you are looking for something really special to round out your trip to Nuuk, doing a remote helicopter landing on an iconic mountain peak has to be right up there. I highly recommend the Helicopter Summit Flight from Nuuk – and it is even more spectacular if you time it for about an hour before sunset.  You won’t be disappointed!

Discover more about Greenland

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk is the most comprehensive online guide for planning your vacation to Greenland’s capital. Definitely a must-read for anyone thinking of visiting.

You can read more about my experiences in Greenland both here and on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Sletten//Narsarsuaq – Nuuk Nordic Culture Festival 2019

Sletten//Narsarsuaq is the most powerful piece of theatre I have ever seen. The highlight of the Nuuk Nordic Culture Festival in 2019 for me, I am still deeply affected by these stories and the remarkable performances I experienced.

The Nuuk Nordic Culture Festival (also known as Nuuk Nordisk) is a biannual week-long festival that brings together artists from throughout Nordic countries.  As soon as the early-bird tickets were released back in April, I bought mine – allowing me unlimited access to almost everything that would happen during the festival week.

I had no idea what to expect. But when the program came out several months later, my eyes were immediately drawn to a series of performances that would be held in the “Blocks” – old, run-down apartment buildings that still occupy prime real-estate in central Nuuk.

The official poster for Narsarsuaq // Sletten

Nuuk’s Apartment Blocks

I have a strange fascination with the Blocks. Particularly Block P, which was the largest and has become the most famous of them. It was demolished in 2012, 5 years before I visited Greenland for the first time. But that has not stopped me from seeking out information and pouring over the display about it in Nuutoqaq – the Nuuk Local Museum, which features photographs and other items rescued during the demolition. I even found and bought a book about Block P in the Nuuk Art Museum during the week of the festival!

Part of the exhibition about Block P in Nuutoqaq - Nuuk's local museum
Part of the exhibition about Block P in Nuutoqaq

The Blocks were built in the 1960s/70s as part of the Danish Government’s G60 program to urbanize Greenland and move people from the small settlements into larger towns and cities. The aim was to give the Greenlanders the same standard of living as that which existed in Denmark – an admirable aim to be sure. However, having to transition from an Inuit hunter to an apartment-dwelling city worker essentially overnight was too much for many of the displaced locals, and the social ramifications are still felt throughout Greenland.

Some of the Blocks in downtown Nuuk
Some of the Blocks in downtown Nuuk.

Narsarsuaq//Sletten

This is exactly what the Narsarsuaq//Sletten multi-performance theatre was about. The description of this large production was essentially as follows:

Narsarsuaq//Sletten. The Blocks 1-10. This area tells the newer story of Nuuk, and of Greenland.

In the 70’s the urbanization of Greenland took place and many small settlements were forced to close. Fishermen and hunters came with their families from beautiful areas along the coast, and were suddenly put into small apartments. What happened? How was it. How is it?

Some were happy (they had all the modern conveniences) and were able to build good strong families. Others lost themselves and their identities.

The Narsarsuaq//Sletten today is full of memories and stories – beautiful, hard, fulfilled, unfulfilled, warm and devastating stories. Stories of the lives that have been lived over the past 30 years and continue to be lived.

Nuuk Nordisk Program 2019

Pink handprints adorn one of the walls of an apartment in Block 1 - currently being demolished in Nuuk
Pink hand-prints adorn one of the walls of an apartment in Block 1. This Block is currently being torn down – erasing more stories of the lives that have been lived there.

The 5 performances making up this epic show each touched on different aspects of this urbanization project. A production by Teater FreezeProductions, directed by Hanne Trap Friis and featuring some of Greenland’s best actors, dancers, writers and storytellers, I couldn’t wait until they played in English during the last 3 days of the festival (they were in Greenlandic during the first 3 days).

“The View”

“Out this window I have a view of one of the Blocks. Out my other window, I have a view of another of the Blocks. Where I used to live, my views went on forever…”

The View

So begins the monologue of an old Greenlandic lady sitting at her kitchen table in her apartment in Block 2. Makka Kleist delivered an extraordinary solo performance, drawing us in with her storytelling as she reminisced about her life in the settlement with her beloved Kali. At intervals, these happy memories were interrupted by noises from neighbouring apartments, and both she and the audience would abruptly return to the new reality. That of city life in a small apartment.  

The way she tells it, there certainly were advantages to moving into the Blocks (it was warm, there was running water, everything worked at the press of a button), but it is clear that her heart still longed to be out in the fjord living the harder life.

“Sletten”

This was the most powerful piece of theatre I have ever seen! Kudos to Kim Leine who wrote it, and Helene Kvint, Karina Møller and Thomas Knuth who performed it.

The story is about a Danish nurse and his wife who come to Greenland for a 2-year stint in the hospital in Nuuk.  It is a no-hold-barred look at the relationship between Greenland and Denmark that is played out in the interpersonal relationships of this couple and a Greenlandic woman who has an affair with the husband.

A scene from Sletten

What made it so powerful were the subjects that it broached and the way in which it broached them – head on, in your face, with no holds barred. But also, the fact that it was performed in such a small space. The audience was sat along the two long walls of what I imagine was the living room/kitchen in one of the apartments. The room was about 6m wide and perhaps 15m long (probably an over-estimation), and most of the action took place in the middle of the room. The actors were so close to the audience that you couldn’t help but feel as if you were in the middle of what was going on. And the fact that the actors actually acknowledged the audience as part of the play when they entered the room for the first time, cemented the fact that we were all in this together.

Scene from "Sletten" showing how close the audience is to the performance - part of Sletten//Narsarsuaq
You can’t help but feel like you are part of the scene when the stage is this small and you are sat in the thick of the action

I have never been so affected by a performance in my entire life!

And I have no connection with the history between Greenland and Denmark.  I cannot imagine what it must have felt like as a Dane or Greenlander to have your relationship portrayed in such a raw manner. Certainly, there were many eyes that glistened with tears (my own included) by the end of the performance, and the standing ovation the actors received could only begin to express how much we had been all been affected.

In Zombieland

This was another powerful experience based on stories from the collection of novels written by Sørine Steenholdt. Through poetry, dance and music, three young people explored the dreams, fears and hopes of Greenland’s youth while raising to the fore many of the social issues that affect them. Amazing performances by all three actors (Amisuna Berthelsen, Hans-Henrik Suersaq Poulsen and Nukakkuluk Kreutzman), touching on suicide (Greenland has the highest suicide rate in the world), drunkenness and child abuse. No photographs were allowed during this performance.

Boy meets Concrete

I have to admit, I’m a very literal person and not really into interpretive dance. However, I did go to see this performance which apparently explored how “the soft human soul and flesh meet the challenge of the concrete, of the city”. No photographs were allowed during this performance.

Remembering Lisa

The final performance in the series told the story of “Lisa” – a Greenlandic woman who was murdered in Block 6 back in 1985. How many of the current residents of Nuuk remember that this happened? The answer: not many.

And this was the point of the performance. Showing how we should never forget people’s lives, no matter how “ordinary” they may have been.

"Lisa" serving tea in her kitchen to welcome us to the performance "Remembering Lisa", part of Narsarsuaq//Sletten
Lisa serves us tea as she welcomes us to her kitchen in “Remembering Lisa’

The story was told through a re-enactment of what may have taken place on that fateful day. Amidst the certainty of the football game happening at the stadium, the fact that kids would have been playing outside between the blocks, and the knowledge of the weather on the day and who the Prime Minister of Greenland was at the time, it is still unknown who killed Lisa. Possible scenarios for the 3 suspects were played out, with two of them rooted once again in the social issues that are still found in Greenland. 

A light-hearted moment arises about two-thirds of the way through when Lisa decides that she wants to change the outcome of the story and not end up dead. She forces a re-work of each of the scenarios, interacting with each of the potential suspects in a more generous manner to see if that could make a difference.  In two of the scenarios – the outcome was different. But the third…

Lisa consoling one of her suspected murderers in order to try to effect a different outcome in "Remembering Lisa", part of Sletten//Narsarsuaq
Trying to rewrite history in “Remembering Lisa”

Final thoughts on Narsarsuaq//Sletten

I have no idea whether this amazing epic will ever be shown elsewhere or ever again. I am so thankful I was able to experience it.

Staging it in the Blocks themselves was absolutely inspired, and I heard the director discuss this as a conscious (and necessary) choice at an Artist Talk during the Nuuk Nordic Culture Festival.  The performances would still be amazing in another venue, but to be couped up in the heart of where these stories took place was particularly powerful.

I cannot thank Teater FreezeProductions and all the people involved enough for such an incredible experience. The absolute highlight of Nuuk Nordisk for me.

Recommendation

If you are interested in experiencing a wide range of Nordic culture and art, you should time your visit to Greenland to coincide with the bi-annual Nuuk Nordic Culture Festival. Read more about the festival itself in this article about Nuuk Nordisk, and discover more of what there is to see and do in Greenland’s capital city in the Ultimate Guide to Nuuk.

Discover more about Greenland

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk provides a complete list of festivals that take place throughout the year in Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, where to eat, and what to do once you arrive.

You can read more about my experiences in Greenland both here and on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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2019 Akisuanerit Festival – Nuuk

After 2 long years of waiting, I finally got to see my absolute favourite band in all the world – Nanook – play as part of the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk. Featuring both domestic and international artists and a wide range of musical styles, this 3-day music festival is one of the biggest in Greenland and a great place to discover musicians from the world’s largest island.

My favourite band – Nanook

Nanook were one of the first acts to be announced for this year’s festival, and I think I may have been first in line to buy a ticket to the Saturday night when they were released. There was no way I was going to miss them this time! The added bonus was that another of my favourite Greenlandic performers – Kimmernaq – was also scheduled to play the same night, as was the headline performer – Danish artist, MØ.

Akisuanerit Festival – arriving at Katuaq

Months after buying the ticket, the big night finally arrived.  Determined to reclaim “the spot” I had occupied for the Ole Kristiansen concert in the Katuaq Foyer earlier in the year (one of the best places for short people like me), I rushed my friends through dinner and out the door so that we would arrive early.

Lineup poster for the Akisuanerit Festival 2019 in Nuuk, Greenland
Program for Akisuanerit 2019

Unfortunately, I had not read the schedule very closely and we found the doors still firmly locked when we arrived at 8:30pm. I thought the first act was scheduled for 9pm, but it turned out that was when the doors would be opened.

Oops! 

I wasn’t the only one to be making my friends stand out in the cold, however. Elaine – a 68 year old lady from Florida and another enormous Nanook fan – was also stranded outside.  When we were finally let in, I headed straight for “the spot” and claimed it with no worries at all. But I think my friends will double-check anything written in Danish next time before taking my word for it 🙂

Akisuanerit Festival – Kimmernaq and Adam

The first performers of the night were Greenlandic singer Kimmernaq and her brother Adam. I’d come across Kimmernaq about a year ago and immediately fell in love with her amazing voice and many of the songs off her two albums. Perhaps this isn’t surprising given her second album was written by Frederik Elsner from Nanook!

Covers of Kimmernaq's 2 album

I had heard her songs performed by many local musicians in towns and settlements around Greenland, but I was really excited to actually hear her in person. She was fab!

Kimmernaq and her brother Adam playing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk 2019
Kimmernaq and Adam

She sang a mixture of songs during her performance, including many of her own as well as a few Radiohead covers that allowed her and her brother to harmonize gloriously. Adam turned out to be an incredible singer in his own right, performing a solo, melancholic folk-style song that aligned exactly with the type of music I love. What an incredible start to the night!

Adam, Kimmernaq and Nathan performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Adam, Kimmernaq and Nathan

Their set culminated in an amazing hip-hop collaboration with several other Greenlandic artists, including Nina Kreutzmann Jørgensen, Pilu Lynge and Da Bartali Crew. Something very different to her usual stuff – and seriously, seriously awesome! Yes, even for someone who is not into hip-hop music.

Adam, Kimmernaq, Nina, Pilu and Da Bartali Crew performing a hip-hop collaboration at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Adam, Kimmernaq, Da Bartali Crew (back), Nina and Pilu performing their hip-hop collaboration

Buy music from Kimmernaq at: Atlantic Music Shop, iTunes


Akisuanerit Festival – Nanook

Next up was the band I had come to see – Nanook. I discovered their music about 2 years ago when I was living in Ecuador and have listened to almost nothing else ever since! If you’ve been following me for a while, you will have seen my blog posts about them both here and on Guide to Greenland 🙂  I had been trying to see them play live since 2017 (I missed them by less than 12 hours in Sisimiut in 2018) and I finally got the chance here in Nuuk.

Nanook official image

The wait was totally worth it!

They started out with the amazing soundscape of Minguitsuugami – one of my favourite tracks off their latest album, Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq – and played a mixture of old and new songs from their 11-year career.

Greenlandic band - Nanook - performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Nanook

There is something really special about seeing your favourite musicians play live, and it can only be surpassed when they actually give you a shout-out/name-drop in the middle of their performance 🙂  One of the highlights of my year!

I love these guys!

Buy music from Nanook at:  Atlantic Music, Amazon (Nanook, Ataasiusutut Misigissuseq), iTunes, Spotify


Akisuanerit Festival – Tarrak

A surprise addition to the program was Greenlandic rapper, Tarrak. Performing with KimoJax, they sang his controversial hit “Tupilak” – a song that highlights some of the difficult aspects of the relationship between Greenland and Denmark.

Tarrak and KimoJax performing Tupilak at the Akisuanerit Festival, Nuuk 2019
Tarrak (left) and KimoJax (right) performing “Tupilak”

The linked YouTube clip includes an English translation of the lyrics, and although I am not a fan of rap, I think this song is amazing.

Akisuanerit Festival – Julie

Julie Berthelsen is one of the biggest Greenlandic pop singers, and insanely popular judging by the reaction of the masses who had packed into the foyer of the Katuaq Cultural Center by this time.

Julie singing her very popular songs at Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk, 2019
Julie

Personally, her music is not my cup of tea. But I have to admit to liking the song “League of Light” which she sang with Nina Kreutzmann Jørgensen as Greenland’s entry to the Danish qualifier for Eurovision 2019. Nina joined her on stage again at the Akisuanerit Festival to finish off her set with this number.

Akisuanerit Festival –

The headline act for the 2019 festival was internationally famous Danish singer, . To be honest, I had no idea who MØ was or what her music sounded like (yes, I can be a little behind the times), but given I was there I figured I should stay awake, stick around and give her a go.

She. Was. Amazing!

MØ performing at the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk 2019
MØ was fabulous

She didn’t appear until about 1:20am, but when she did, her energy and stage presence were amazing and her vocals were flawless. I’m now a massive fan!

MØ and her band playing in Katuaq, Nuuk

Summary

For a person who normally goes to bed around 10pm, this was a huge night! MØ finished at 2:30am and I had a 30-minute walk to get home afterwards. Even then, I found it difficult to fall asleep. Between the ringing in my ears and the high of finally seeing Nanook play live – my brain would not let go of the awesome night.

If you are a music lover and also interested in visiting Greenland – perhaps try to plan your trip for end-September/start-October so you can catch the Akisuanerit Festival in Nuuk. Like the festival’s Facebook page to stay up to date with the latest news, and check out the Ultimate Guide to Nuuk to discover what else there is to see and do while you visit Greenland’s capital.

Discover more about Greenland

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk provides a complete list of festivals that take place throughout the year in Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, where to eat, and what to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
Like what you have read? Please follow and like me:
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Nuuk Multi Kulti Festival 2019

Greenland’s capital, Nuuk, has many festivals that are spaced throughout the year. One of the key events during Winter is Nuuk Multi Kulti – a 4 day celebration of cultural diversity in this small and remote city.

During my 2 months in Nuuk, I’d met people from Greenland and Denmark (OK, no surprises there), Mexico, Spain, Argentina (yes, I’ve had a lot of opportunity to practice my Spanish), Lithuania, Japan, Hungary, Norway, Sweden, Russia, Philippines, Canada, USA, Scotland, Australia … and that’s just off the top of my head. There is a huge diversity of nationalities who have made Nuuk their home, at least for a few years.

The aim of Nuuk Multi Kulti is to celebrate this diversity and showcase both Greenlandic and other cultures. I was keen to head out and attend as much of it as possible – especially with the promise of food at many events 😀

Representing multiculturalism through an artist-designed flag

It kicked off with an event by the Nuuk Art Museum – the raising of a flag at the flagpole outside Holms Hus near the centre of Nuuk.  Artist Gudrun Hasle had invited other artists from different countries to design a flag to represent the idea of Nuuk Multi Kulti, and the first to be hoisted was that of Greenlandic artist: Miki Jacobsen.

When I arrived, there was a small cluster of people at the end a narrow path that had been shoveled through the 1-metre deep snow to the flagpole. Miki (yes, the artist himself) was putting the finishing touches on it, carving a wider circle to accommodate more people.

Miki shoveling snow around the flagpole - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Miki shoveling snow

As with all events in Nuuk, tea, coffee and cake was in plentiful supply

Coffee and Cake at Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
A staple at any event in Greenland

before Miki unfurled his flag and raised it high over the snowy landscape.

Montage of the hoisting of Miki's flag - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Hoisting the flag

It was a mixture of the Greenlandic and Canadian flags, with a ½-red, ½-write maple leaf replacing the equivalent circle in the Greenlandic Flag.  He explained that the flag represented the fact that he was born in and currently lives in Greenland, but was educated as an artist in Canada. He also has a son who lives in Canada, and to whom the flag was dedicated. The design was to symbolize this mix between the two cultures.

Artist flag flying high  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland

Cultural Showcase

The next event I made it to was held the following afternoon at the public library in downtown Nuuk. Weeks in advance, a call was put out (I saw it through the Internationals in Nuuk Facebook Group) looking for people from other parts of the world to showcase their country of origin in whatever way they deemed appropriate.

On the day, there were several “booths” set up amidst the books on the second floor of the library. Norway, Finland, Spain, Hungary, France, Philippines, Russia, Dominican Republic, USA, amongst many others were represented,

Silvia from Canary Islands at  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Silvia from the Canary Islands also talking about Spain

and most chose to focus on the food of their country – an easy sell to be sure!

Finnish food  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Finnish food!

Some went even further and dressed up in national costume, this lady from Russia even had other outfits from her homeland that you could try on!

Russian stall  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Russian booth

A special mention to my friends Fruzsina and Miki who put together a quiz about their homeland of Hungary. I daren’t post my results here …  clearly I need to visit and learn about the country from a local!

Where do we come from?

The next day I headed to Illorput – a local Community Centre that was hosting several different events. An ongoing activity there throughout the whole of Nuuk Multi Kulti involved a map of the world made from sealskin. The idea was to draw a connection with a piece of string from your place of origin to Nuuk.

Map of where we come from  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Map of where we come from. This was very early on in the festival – there were many more pins by the end

I was attending the first event they were hosting so it was early days, and you can probably pick the string that I placed 😊

Greenlandic Food Tasting

The main reason I was at Illorput, however, was to experience the Greenlandic Food Tasting. I ran into a friend and his daughter the instant I walked in the door, and the three of us loaded up on local cuisine and sat down to chat.

The spread was amazing! And all of it really delicious.

Table full of Greenlandic tasters  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Greenlandic tasters

I took one of the biodegradable bamboo boats of halibut and smoked salmon with pesto (actually, I might have gone back for a second); one of the boats of dried cod, dried capelin, and salted whale blubber; and a boat that contained a halibut “meatball” with remoulade. But there were also boats containing Greenlandic Prawns and mayonnaise, and a large pot of Greenlandic lamb soup.

Greenlandic food tasters  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Greenlandic food tasters – yum!

Oh, how I love Greenlandic food!

Parallels between Greenlandic and Icelandic visual art

Once I’d finished my lunch, I walked the rest of the way into town to the Nuuk Art Museum. One of my friends, Lorenzo, was studying in Iceland but doing an internship in Nuuk for several months. He was giving a tour talking about the similarities and differences in Greenlandic and Icelandic visual art from the late 1800s through to more modern times.

We started in the Emmanuel A. Pederson (1894 – 1948) room where Lorenzo explained a little about how this famous Danish artist depicted a romanticized Greenland in his paintings.

Lorenzo talking about Emmanuel Pederson at Nuuk Art Museum as part of  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Lorenzo talking about Emmanuel Pederson at Nuuk Art Museum

Blue skies or dramatically colourful sunsets (there is obviously no bad weather in Greenland), kayaks, sled dogs, and generic figures who are more avatars within the image rather than individual people, characterize his paintings. As does the feeling of distance from the scene. Of looking in from the outside. Something that perhaps reflects his own feelings of coming from outside (Denmark) to observe Greenland.

Surprisingly, this view of their own country, though far from reality, was adopted by Greenlanders – perhaps due to the emergence of nationalist feelings around this time and the desire to develop their own national identity.

Emmanuel Pederson room at Nuuk Art Museum

This painting style was compared and contrasted with that of the Icelandic artist, Þórarinn Þorláksson (1867 – 1924), who also painted in the romantic style. Those of you who have visited Iceland know how unpredictable its weather is, but Þórarinn mostly painted good weather in his artworks, which are more representations of Icelandic landscapes than actual depictions. Also similar to Pederson, there is a feeling of distance from nature when viewing the work. That you are outside looking in. But in this case, there are no people depicted at all, not even avatars.

Later in the tour, Lorenzo contrasted the more contemporary art of Frederik Kristensen, otherwise known as Kunngi (1952 – present), to that of Icelandic Finnur Jónsson (1892 – 1993). 

Lorenzo talking about Greenlandic and Icelandic art parallels  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland

Kunngi was the first Greenlandic artist to create non-figurative images. The absence of typical Greenlandic iconography caused some to question whether his works could really be called “Greenlandic”, despite the fact that was born, lives, and creates his art in Greenland.

Kuungi art work- Nuuk Art Museum
Kuungi artwork

A few decades earlier over in Iceland, Finnur was having his own issues in having his expressionist/cubist artworks accepted. While these art styles were well established in mainland Europe, and particularly in Germany where he studied for a while, they were new to Iceland. In contrast to Kunngi, the criticism was not directed at the “Icelandicness” or otherwise of the pieces, but stemmed more from general theories of art in Iceland and what the definition of good Icelandic art should be. There was also a concern that the works would have a negative influence of Icelandic culture as they thought that such artistic expressions were manifestations of a sick and unbalanced mind, isolated from reality and nature.  Not surprisingly, these were not characteristics they wanted to promote.

Lorenzo also examined two other sets of artists in this short tour of the similarities and differences in the development of Greenlandic and Icelandic art, and I was so glad this talk was in English 😀 It was fascinating!

Cultural Masks

After Lorenzo had finished his talk, I raced from the Nuuk Art Museum down to the Katuaq Cultural Centre, where they had already starting packing up the exhibition of cultural masks made by school children aged 12-14 years.

Cultural masks as part of  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Masks inspired by different world cultures

The idea was for them to create their own mask using inspiration from Sri Lanka, Alaska and Nigeria/Congo.  I was a little surprised that Greenlandic masks were not part of this activity (at least the people packing up the exhibition didn’t think so), but none-the-less there were some very impressive efforts! I loved this one in particular whose caption reads “This mask is for those who are feeling under pressure”.

Under pressure mask  - Nuuk Multi Kulti - West Greenland
Under pressure

I ran out of time at Nuuk Multi Kulti!

Unfortunately, that’s where my experiences of Nuuk Multi Kulti 2019 finished. There were many more activities on the schedule that I didn’t manage to make it to – some simply because of timing, some because they were only held in Greenlandic or Danish (I’m learning, but very slowly).

It was an awesome festival though and I had great fun exploring the events I did attend. I’m looking forward to next year’s event already!

Discover more about Greenland

If you are planning a trip to Nuuk and are interested in catching one of the Festivals that happen throughout the year, check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk which provides a complete list. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, where to eat, and what are the things to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Nuuk Snow Festival – 2019

After an 11 year hiatus, the Nuuk Snow Festival was back in 2019. I was lucky enough to be in town to enjoy this snow sculpting showcase by both local and international teams.

It was -25 degrees Celsius with the wind chill. Perfect conditions for polar bears and to prevent snow from melting, but positively painful for a human venturing out into it. You have to be quite hardy (and slightly insane) if you are going to participate in a snow festival!

Sign for a competitor at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Signs announcing the sponsors, the team and what they would be making at the Nuuk Snow Festival

Day 1 – the sculpting begins

On the Thursday morning, several 3m x 3m x 3m blocks of hard packed snow stood at the ready at Sikuki – Nuuk Harbour to be sculpted into … well, we had to wait and see. Several teams got underway immediately, making sure to use as much of their 3-day sculpting window as possible. Armed with ladders, ice saws, shovels, picks and an arsenal of other tools, they had made various levels of progress by the end of day 1.

Montage of people working on their sculptures at the end of day 1 of the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Progress at the end of Day 1

Other blocks had yet to be touched (their teams delayed in Copenhagen due to bad weather), and there were even a few spares available for late registrations.

Lasse and I visited after work to see the progress and ran into Lasse’s friend David there. On the spur of the moment, the two of them decided to enter the festival. Team “Arctic Penguin” chose their block and brainstormed what they would sculpt as they dropped me home. Although they invited me to be part of it, I wasn’t sure my Australian fingers and toes would survive the bitterly cold temperatures, and decided to leave the Greenlanders to it.

Sign for Arctic Penguin's sculpture - Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Arctic Penguin’s sculpture sign. After throwing around a few different ideas, they decided on a “drop”

Day 2 – Silent Disco and Light Show

Saturday evening it was time to head back in and check on progress. The bonus was a “light show and silent disco” at the sculpture site and slightly less frigid temperatures!

It was amazing to see how much progress had been made and most of the sculptures were heading rapidly towards their final touches! Some teams were even working through it!

Artists working during the night on their sculptures at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
There were still some keen ones!

The “disco” was more like “relaxation music” (at least while I was there, apparently it picked up a bit later), so I decided to just wander through and admire the sculptures without accompaniment.

Montage of the different sculptures lit up at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland

It was a pretty good turnout with people coming and going throughout the evening.

The "igloo" where you picked up your headphones for the silent disco at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
This “igloo” was where you picked up your headphones for the silent disco

Day 3 – Before and after at the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival

It was tools down at 11am the next morning, so I did one last visit around midday to see the final products. They had each started out as a solid 3m x 3m x 3m cube of snow

Untouched block of compacted snow - the starting point for all artists at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Untouched block of compacted snow – the starting point for all artists

But what they had been transformed into was incredible!

Montage of finished sculptures at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Some of the final sculptures from the festival

There was one interactive sculpture that the kids were having a ball playing on

Kids playing on an interactive sculpture at the Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
This was fun – but I watched several kids get clobbered by others coming down the slide 🙂

and I thought team “Arctic Penguin” did an amazing job on the perfect symmetry of their “Drop”.

The finished "drop" by Arctic Penguin at the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
A perfect drop! Well done guys!

Winners of the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival

In the end, Team Qinngorput won the non-figurative category with their Northern Lights sculpture “Light in Depth”

Winner of figurative category of the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland

and Team Sisamaqqat the figurative category with “Transformation” (the walrus, seal, bear intermixed figures). This is perhaps not surprising when you look at the day-to-day carving work by one of the team members Kim Kleist-Eriksen.

Winner of the non-figurative category of the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Just wow!

But all of the sculptures were incredible, including the one done by the volunteers for the festival (which included several of my friends) – even though they somehow managed to leave Canada off their world map…

Embrace the world sculpture at the 2019 Nuuk Snow Festival - West Greenland
Embrace the world!

Recommendation

The Nuuk Snow Festival is a very cool idea (literally and figuratively) and I really hope they run it again next year. If they do (and if I’m in town), I may even brave the cold (Lasse assures me that it is actually quite hot work carving the snow) and enter next time! Better start thinking about what I might be able to carve!

Discover more about Greenland

The Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk provides a complete list of festivals that take place throughout the year in Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, where to eat, and what to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog or on my Greenland-specific blog at Guide to Greenland.

For more information about Greenland, the best websites are Guide to Greenland (which is also a one-stop-shop for many of the tours available), and Visit Greenland, the Government tourism site.

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Sermitsiaq from half-way up Lille Malene

“I think I’ll hike up Lille Malene to catch the sunset. Want to join?”

How could I say “no” to that invite from my friend Lasse. It had been a glorious day, and even though I was still very much in the grip of a mystery illness I’d bought with me from Australia, off I went.

Given we were a little late in setting out, we took the most direct route up the mountain. Straight up Nuuk’s ski piste.

Looking down the main run of Nuuk's downhill skiing centre with a view over the city and the fjord - Nuuk - West Greenland
Looking down the main run of Nuuk’s ski centre

There is a reason they have ski lifts up these things!

I was quickly gasping for breath and my eyes were streaming with tears from the cold air as I tried desperately to keep up with my long-legged friend. Being a Greenlander, he was much more accustomed to the cold and walking in snow than this Australian body! Plus, he is half my age and in full health… what was I thinking?!

A little over half-way up the mountain, Lasse stopped at the first clear viewpoint of the iconic Sermitsiaq mountain. I love this mountain so much!

Hiker at a viewpoint of Sermitsiaq mountain which is glowing in the late afternoon sun - Nuuk - West Greenland
Lasse heading towards an incredible view of Sermitsiaq, which is glowing in the late afternoon sun

We spent several minutes there watching the last of the Sun’s rays illuminate the top of the mountain, before Lasse asked if I wanted to keep going to the top. I suggested that he should go on without me and I’d wait for him to come back.

Me taking photographs of a glowing Sermitsiaq mountain from the viewpoint half way up Lille Malene - Nuuk - West Greenland
Taking a breather! Thanks for the image Lasse 🙂

As he headed off, I perched myself on one of the rocks to watch the light changing on the scene before me. Sunsets in Greenland are some of the most beautiful in the world – a kaleidoscope of pastel colours that fade to darkness rapidly during the Winter months, and not at all during Summer.

Move your mouse over the image to see the full panorama

When it became too cold to sit still, I made my way over to a tall cairn I could see a few hundred metres away.  By the time I had reached it – the blue hour had already begun. So short are the twilights in Nuuk in early February.

Blue hour on Sermitsiaq with pink sunset - Nuuk - West Greenland
Pastel sunsets during blue hour

Lasse reappeared to collect me, and back down the ski slope we plunged – much faster and easier than going up!

And although this little excursion had me hacking my lungs up for the next couple of weeks – I thank Lasse for the invite and will never forget the beauty of that sunset on Sermitsiaq.

Discover more about Greenland

If you enjoy the outdoors and are thinking about visiting Greenland’s capital, check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk, which contains practical information for planning your stay, and the Nature Lovers’ Guide to Nuuk, which focuses on outdoor adventures.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!
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Hinnarik Kammanilu – Greenlandic music

“Hinnarik Kammanilu” are the most popular children’s performers in Greenland. Celebrating their 15th anniversary this year, it shows that buck teeth, a melodica (one of those small keyboards you play with your mouth), an acoustic guitar, and fun songs specifically written for children will forever make you a hit with the kids.

In Australia, we have “The Wiggles”. In Greenland, we have “Hinnarik Kammanilu”.

Poster for the free concert at Nuuk Centre

Translated as “Hinnarik and Friend”, this singing comedic duo have been entertaining the kids of Greenland for 15 years. As part of their anniversary celebration, they were playing free 20-minute concerts in the Nuuk Centre (Nuuk’s shopping mall – the only one in Greenland), so of course I had to go along. Partially this was to experience the Hinnarik phenomenon for myself. And partially because the “friend” is Frederik Elsner – one of the songwriters and lead singers of my favourite band in all the world – Nanook.

I arrived to an absolutely packed house.  Standing room only, and even then, only at the back.

Standing room only!

So, I loitered at the end of their 20-minute performance while they signed CDs, hoping they would play again and I could get myself into a much better position.

Success!

Prime position for the second of the free Hinnarik Kammanilu shows

There were songs I actually recognized!

Hinnarik Kammanilu – Kamaleruit

And others that I didn’t but were truly addictive.

Hinnarik Kammanilu – Diisaq
Hinnarik Kammanilu – Kaakkukkakkit

It was a fun show 😊 and the 20 minutes flew by very quickly!

Afterwards, they met this latest audience of kids and signed more autographs.  And judging by the way the CDs were flying off the table, there will be a lot of “Hinnarik Kammanilu” playing all over Nuuk during the next little while!

Hinnarik signing autographs at the end of the free concert at the Nuuk Centre, West Greenland
Meeting the fans

I only wish I could understand what they were singing!

Hinnarik Kammanilu have a Facebook page if you want to follow along, and you can order their latest CD from the Atlantic Music Store in Nuuk.

Discover more about Greenland

Greenlandic music is a vibrant part of modern culture on the world’s largest island. You can learn more in Guide to Greenland’s Culture Lovers’ Guide to Nuuk, which also highlights how you can explore visual arts, performance arts, architecture, and amazing gastronomy experiences while visiting Greenland’s capital city.

There is also the highly practical Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk with everything you need to know to plan your trip to Nuuk, and the Nature Lovers Guide to Nuuk, if the outdoors is more your thing.

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Greenlandic Music – Ole Kristiansen at Katuaq Cultural Centre

Greenlandic music is some of the best music you’ve never heard of. There is a surprising number of amazing musicians in Greenland, and Ole Kristiansen – a favourite amongst locals – has been around for years. What better way to experience his music for the first time than at the Katuaq Cultural Centre in Nuuk.

I was determined to see a concert during my extended stay in Nuuk this year. While I had desperately hoped that my absolute favourite band, Nanook, would be playing – it was not to be … again 🙁

I did, however, get to see one of Greenland’s perennial favourites play – Ole Kristiansen.

I knew of his work because of the duet he sings on Frederik Elsner’s solo album – “F”. But I’d never listened to it specifically. I pre-purchased my ticket for 250DKK (about AUD$50), and decided I would just turn up and see what it was all about.

Ticket and wristband for Ole Kristiansen concert at Katuaq Cultural Center
Ticket and wristband for the concert

Support act – Jaaku Sørensen

The support act was scheduled to appear at 9pm, so I headed out into the snow storm (boy it was hard to get off the couch!) and caught the bus to arrive at 8:55pm. Uuuuummmmmmm… where was everyone? There were maybe 20 of us in the foyer of Katuaq – and an even larger number of staff, who were preparing the plastic cups of beer that would ultimately lubricate what they anticipated would be a good crowd.

Small number of people turned up to see Jaaku Sørensen - the support act for Ole Kristiansen
Where is everybody?

I felt incredibly sorry for Jaaku Sørensen who had his family, friends and a handful of us who didn’t know him making up a very small crowd in a very large space.

Jaaku Sørensen singing at Katuaq Cultural Centre in Nuuk, West Greenland
Jaaku Sørensen – solo performer

And, to be honest, he was really quite good! His primarily folk-style songs sung mostly in English deserved a much bigger audience. It seems that opening for one of Greenland’s biggest performers, doesn’t actually guarantee you the audience you might expect or deserve in Greenland. Tough crowd!

He played for about 45 minutes in total and people started to arrive during the 30-minute break before the main performance. By the time Ole took the stage – the scene was more like what I was expecting from the outset.

Ole Kristiansen on stage at Katuaq Cultural Centre in front of a large audience
This audience was more what I was expecting

Main act – Ole Kristiansen

I had an awesome position up on a ledge towards the front of the foyer with a clear view of the stage

Ole Kristiansen performing at Katuaq Cultural Centre
I had a great vantage point for the concert. A ledge provided the perfect spot for a short person like me

and the most common sight at concerts around the world these days.

Mobile phone recording Ole Kristiansen at his concert at Katuaq Cultural Centre, Nuuk
This is pretty typical at concerts these days.

From the first note, the crowd went wild. And I was very surprised by how “heavy” his music was. It was definitely within the genre of rock music, not heavy metal music, but I was expecting something lighter.

The music was really good!  Not as good as Nanook 😉, but I could see why it had everyone else in the crowd singing their heart and lungs out. I’d definitely go see him play again.

Despite really enjoying the concert, I ended up leaving at the mid-way break. I’m a big fan of Nuuk’s bus system with the exception of one point – the last bus is waaaaaay too early on a Friday and Saturday night.  Given the storm outside, it was either catch this last bus or hope to be able to get a taxi home ($$$) once the concert had finished. I was happy with the experience I’d had so ended up taking the bus. 

Ole Kristiansen and band playing the Katuaq Cultural Centre in Nuuk, West Greenland

I look forward to my next concert in Greenland! Hopefully it will be Nanook!

Discover more about Greenland

Greenland’s capital, Nuuk, is the hub for modern culture in Greenland. There is everything from music, to visual arts, to performance arts, to architecture, to amazing gastronomy experiences. Read more in Guide to Greenland’s Culture Lover’s Guide to Nuuk.

The best resource on the web if you are planning a trip to Nuuk is the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk, and there is also a Nature Lovers Guide to Nuuk, if the outdoors is more your thing.

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Sarfalik Restaurant Tasting Menu – Nuuk

The Tasting Menu at Sarfalik Restaurant in Nuuk offers a fine-dining experience that allows you to enjoy a wide variety of Greenlandic produce in the one sitting. Professional chefs take the abundances of the season and prepare innovative dishes using a variety of modern techniques for a truly unique taste of Greenland.

In the 2.5 months I’ve been based in Nuuk, I’ve not once been out to a restaurant or café to eat. Cooking for myself is so ingrained (it has to be after more than 3 years of traveling and watching every cent) that I usually forget that going out for a meal is even an option!

However, having written the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk where I relied on restaurant reviews and the recommendations of my friends and colleagues in order to write the “Where to Eat” section, I decided that I had to go out and try one of these places before leaving. I chose to head to the top of the Hotel Hans Egede and indulge in the “Greenlandic Tasting Menu” at Sarfalik Restaurant.

Those of you who have been reading my blog for a while now know how much I love eating and trying new foods. For example, the Traditional Greenlandic Buffet at the Hotel Sisimiut and the Foodie Tour with Your Friend in Reykjavik were two of my travel highlights for 2018. Needless to say, I was really looking forward to the experience as Nicolai (from Denmark) seated me at a table by the window with a view to one of the well-known mountains near Nuuk – Store Malene.

Sunset over Store Malene from Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk- West Greenland
Sunset on Store Malene (the tallest of the peaks) as seen from Sarfalik Restaurant

Before the Tasting Menu begins

As I unwrapped the napkin from its strip of binding sealskin, Nicolai placed a “snack” down in front of me. Humpback whale with soy marinade and mustard mayo, and seaweed with a little onion mayo.

Humpback whale snack at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
Humpback whale with soy marinade and mustard mayo, and seaweed with a little onion mayo

Although many people would balk at eating whale, it is very much a part of life in Greenland. Mattak (the raw skin of certain types of whale) used to provide the Inuit with several important nutrients, and is still a delicacy that is served at Kaffemiks (celebrations) in modern times.

I’ve tried whale meat on a few occasions in both Greenland and Iceland and have always really enjoyed it.  This was no exception. The meat was melt-in-the-mouth tender with a subtle soy flavor. It was a great start to what I expected to be an amazing experience.

Next to appear on the table was a basket of warm bread. The white rolls had a wonderfully crusty exterior, and the malt rolls had a more cake-like texture with a rich taste that was enhanced by the salt crystals sprinkled on top. When loaded up with chive butter, keeping my hand out the bread basket was very difficult, even though I knew I had to.

Two types of bread at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
How to resist?!

Now for the Tasting Menu

The first real course of the Tasting Menu (no, we hadn’t even started yet!) was delivered by Åsmund from Norway. It was an Italian-inspired musk ox empanada with rosemary mayo. There had been an “Italian Takeover” of Sarfalik Restaurant during the previous two weeks by visiting chefs, and this dish was created based on what they showcased during their stay.

Musk-ox empanada as part of the Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk - West Greenland
Musk ox empanada with rosemary mayo

One of the interesting things about the Tasting Menu is that it changes several times per year according to the produce that is in season. However, because it is made up of several small portions, there is also the flexibility to mix it up when an interesting opportunity arises.  

Åsmund (who has a touch of an Australian accent despite never having worked in Australia?!) also presented me with the next dish – reindeer tenderloin with celeriac. The tenderloin was cured with sage and the half-ring of celeriac underneath it was pickled in red wine vinegar and hibiscus. Celeriac cream, crunchy sage “chips” and sprinkled dried Angelica topped off the dish. Åsmund explained that normally the celeriac cream would also have had fresh sage in it, but they were having supply issues. One example of the challenges faced by even a high-end restaurant in Greenland.

reindeer tenderloin with celeriac  on the tasting menu at Sarfalik Restaurant - Nuuk - West Greenland
Reindeer tenderloin with celeriac

The reindeer was very smooth and tender with a mild taste of jerky. Delicious! I was less a fan of the celeriac, but that’s just because I don’t enjoy the taste of wine. The cream gave me a hint of what celeriac tastes like (I’d not eaten it before) and I look forward to another opportunity to try it in its more natural state.

Next up was cold smoked humpback whale with turnip presented in 3 ways.

Cold smoked humpback whale - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk -West Greenland
Cold smoked humpback whale with turnip

The whale was smoked in-house and had a texture more like that of raw fish than what I would normally associate with meat. Its colour was also very dark and Åsmund went on to explain that while this is a general characteristic of humpback whale meat, the cold smoking process (and lack of exposure to heat) actually makes it darker.

The turnips offered 3 completely different experiences of this root vegetable. The fermented turnips (triangles) were quite acidic and sharp, the pickled turnip (julienne) was also quite sharp but somehow had a sweetness to it too. The roasted turnip puree was very creamy and, for me, had the strongest and most recognizable turnip flavor.

My next course was bought out by Matthias from Argentina. Nicolai had told me that Matthias usually doesn’t get to do front-of-house because he is not very confident with his English. But given I speak Spanish…

The plate that Matthias put in front of me was burnt cod with Greenlandic herbs and roasted tomato sauce. Matthias introduced it to me in Spanish, wished me pleasant eating, and disappeared quickly back into the kitchen.

Burnt Cod - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk Greenland
Burnt cod with Greenlandic herbs

The cod was perfectly cooked and the roasted tomato sauce very creamy. Like everything that had come before, it was delicious, though I was starting to worry about the fact that portion sizes seemed to be growing! I crossed my fingers I would be able to fit everything in.  And yes. I was still managing to resist the lure of the bread.

Meeting the head chef – Simon

The next person to appear at my table with an orange granatine palette cleanser turned out to be the head chef, Simon. He is originally from Sweden (the kitchen is very multicultural) and had been working at Sarfalik for 2.5 years, 1.5 of those as head chef. He was much younger than I expected and I was looking forward to chatting with him about the inspiration for and challenges of putting together a Tasting Menu such as this in Greenland.

Orange Granitine - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk - West Greenland
Orange granatine

He returned with my main dish – musk ox with grilled sweet potato, musk ox souffle and musk ox glace – and said he’d be happy to chat after I’d enjoyed my meal.

This dish was fantastic! The musk ox was like a fine steak cooked to perfection. The glace, beautifully rich. And the elements on the plate aligned with the Greenlandic tradition of not wasting anything.  The glace was made using the bones of the musk ox. The puree and chips were made from the castoffs of the grilled sweet potato. I love this approach.

Main dish – Spring Tasting Menu

Musk Ox with Grilled Sweet Potato - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - Nuuk Greenland
Musk ox with grilled sweet potato

Once I’d finished eating, Simon joined me at my table while we waited for the dessert to be ready. He explained the idea behind the Tasting Menu – to create high quality food that works with the abundances and limitations of the current season in Greenland and neighboring countries.

For example, February is musk ox hunting season in Greenland, so the main today was a musk ox plate. Later in the year during reindeer hunting season, the Tasting Menu would instead feature a reindeer-based main dish. Right now, root vegetables (the staples of Nordic countries) support whatever meat is available (though this, too, will change as the seasons change), and locally sourced herbs that grow wild in the backcountry around Nuuk (like Angelica) are used whenever possible.

“The goal is to tell a story with the Tasting Menu”, Simon tells me.

A story that is dictated by the season.  A story that features local produce sourced directly from the fishermen and hunters while acknowledging Nordic influences on Greenland. A story that showcases the multicultural nature of Nuuk through the use of different cooking techniques drawn from the countries of origin and experiences of the kitchen staff of Sarfalik Restaurant.

I was very much looking forward to how the last chapter of today’s story would unfold!

Spring Tasting Menu dessert

When Simon returned, he came bearing a magnificent Chervil-based dessert. The menu describes it as the following: “Chervil and cream cheese ice cream with yoghurt crisps, liquorice sprinkles, and chervil grass”, but I prefer the story that Simon told me about it.

Nuuk Spring - Sarfalik Tasting Menu - West Greenland
Nuuk Spring

It symbolizes Spring in Nuuk. The green represents plants starting to grow and the brown (burnt white chocolate), the dirt that is slowly revealed by the melting snow. However, just like the Spring we have been experiencing during my stay, a period of warmer weather is abruptly interrupted by a cold snap, and fresh snow (the white fluff) once again covers the landscape.

Brilliant!

And delicious!

The chervil cream cheese ice cream was silky smooth and creamy with a mild flavor that was offset by the much stronger chervil syrup. The yoghurt chips were crisp and almost toffee-like, and the thyme snow (it was meant to be chervil snow, but again, supply problems) was lighter and fluffier than sherbet and disintegrated immediately upon contact with my tongue. I didn’t think anything could dissolve more readily than sherbet, but I have been proven wrong!

It was a spectacular end to an amazing meal that was further enhanced as the setting sun momentarily peaked out from underneath the cloud layer to bathe the restaurant in incredible golden light. Moments like this are truly magical.

Golden sunset through Sarfalik Restaurant on top of the Hotel Hans Egede in Nuuk - West Greenland
Golden sunset through Sarfalik Restaurant on top of the Hotel Hans Egede

Recommendation

The Tasting Menu at Sarfalik Restaurant in Nuuk is a wonderful way to try local Greenlandic ingredients prepared in innovative ways. The small portion sizes and large number of courses mean you get to taste a wide range of produce, all prepared with the imagination and ingenuity of top professional chefs. There is also the option to pair the menu with a carefully chosen wine selection.

A million thanks to Simon, Åsmund, Nicolai and Matthias for looking after me and a wonderful experience. I look forward to returning again in September to try to the Autumn version of the Tasting Menu!

Discover more about Greenland

For recommendations on where to eat in Nuuk, check out the Ultimate Travel Guide to Nuuk – the best resource on the web for those planning a trip to Greenland’s capital. It also has loads of practical information on how to get to Nuuk, how to get around, where to stay, and all the things to do once you arrive.

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

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Arctic-Circle-Race-podium-1024x541.jpg

Australian victory in Greenland’s Arctic Circle Race

Video: Mads Fridolin Vejlby

The Australian National Anthem playing in Greenland.

Wait, what?!

Yes. Much to everyone’s surprise, Phillip Bellingham (a fellow Aussie from Victoria) beat local legend Martin Møller to the finish line of the 2019 Arctic Circle Race by a mere 3 minutes and 18 seconds.

This 160km, 3-day event near Sisimiut is widely renowned as the toughest ski race in the world. Greenlander Martin Møller has won it for the past several years and it was a very close race to be beaten by such a short margin over this distance!

Phillip explains his strategy for the race at breakfast on Day 2.

Video: Mads Fridolin Vejlby

And it proved to be a good plan, as the deciding factor ended up being a sprint to the finish line between Phillip and Martin.

Video: Mads Fridolin Vejlby

One of the reasons the Arctic Circle Race is so tough is because Sisimiut is surrounded by very mountainous terrain. Another is because participants have to camp out with minimal equipment for 2 nights, preparing their own food and taking care of themselves. You need a strong mental attitude to be able to cope with this on top of a grueling day on skis in cold temperatures!

Unfortunately I wasn’t in Sisimiut to see the race for myself. However, I do know the terrain around Greenland’s second largest city as I spent over a week there last year hiking and exploring the area during the Summer. It is a spectacularly beautiful part of the world as the following drone footage courtesy of Mads Fridolin Vejlby shows.

Video: Mads Fridolin Vejlby
Music: Nanook

Congratulations Phillip!

Are you coming back next year to defend your title?

Discover more about Greenland

I have a large number of blog posts about Greenland, so feel free to read more about my experiences here on my blog.

Or, if this post has piqued your curiosity about Greenland in general, learn more about this amazing country by:

This post contains some affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Your support is appreciated!



Like what you have read? Please follow and like me: